Meta-cognition about biological sex and gender-stereotypic physical appearance: Consequences for the assessment of leadership competence

Sczesny, Sabine; Kühnen, Ulrich (2004). Meta-cognition about biological sex and gender-stereotypic physical appearance: Consequences for the assessment of leadership competence. Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, 30(1), pp. 13-21. Sage 10.1177/0146167203258831

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Previous findings are inconsistent with regard to whether men are judged as being more or less competent leaders than women. However, masculine-relative to feminine-looking persons seem to be judged consistently as more competent leaders. Can this different impact of biological sex and physical appearance be due to the disparate availability of meta-cognitive knowledge about both sources? The results of Study 1 indicated that individuals possess meta-cognitive knowledge about a possible biasing influence of persons’ biological sex, but not for their physical appearance. In Study 2, participants judged the leadership competence of a male versus female stimulus person with either masculine or feminine physical appearance. In addition, the available cognitive capacity was manipulated. When high capacity was available, participants corrected for the influence of stimulus persons’ sex, but they fell prey to this influence under cognitive load. However, the effect of physical appearance was not moderated by cognitive capacity.

Item Type:

Journal Article (Original Article)

Division/Institute:

07 Faculty of Human Sciences > Institute of Psychology > Social Psychology and Social Neuroscience

UniBE Contributor:

Sczesny, Sabine

Subjects:

100 Philosophy > 150 Psychology

ISSN:

0146-1672

Publisher:

Sage

Language:

English

Submitter:

Sabine Sczesny

Date Deposited:

10 Feb 2016 16:27

Last Modified:

12 Sep 2017 07:21

Publisher DOI:

10.1177/0146167203258831

PubMed ID:

15030639

BORIS DOI:

10.7892/boris.75338

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/75338

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