Is "milk crust" a transient form of golden retriever ichthyosis?

Roethig, Anja; Schildt, Kirsti J M; Welle, Monika Maria; Wildermuth, Brett E; Neiger, Reto; Thom, Nina (2015). Is "milk crust" a transient form of golden retriever ichthyosis? Veterinary dermatology, 26(4), 265-e57. Blackwell Science 10.1111/vde.12216

[img] Text
vde12216.pdf - Published Version
Restricted to registered users only
Available under License Publisher holds Copyright.

Download (615kB) | Request a copy

BACKGROUND

A recessive inherited form of lamellar ichthyosis is well recognized in golden retrievers. In this breed, young puppies demonstrate a self-limiting scaling disorder which is commonly recognized by breeders, who use the term "milk crust" to describe this syndrome.

HYPOTHESIS/OBJECTIVES

To determine whether "milk crust" is a new keratinization disorder or a self-limiting form of golden retriever ichthyosis.

ANIMALS

A total of 179 golden retriever dogs (21 dams and 158 puppies) were examined.

METHODS

Dermatological examination and assessment of the patatin-like phospholipase-1 (PNPLA1) genotype by PCR testing of buccal mucosal swabs. Skin biopsies from one affected puppy were evaluated for histopathological abnormalities.

RESULTS

Forty-five of 158 (28%) puppies exhibited scaling at 8 weeks of age; 113 of 158 (72%) were dermatologically normal. Of 144 analysed samples, 40 of 144 (28%) puppies demonstrated a homozygous mutation of the PNPLA1 genotype [of which, 36 of 40 (90%) had signs of scaling], 77 of 144 (53%) demonstrated a heterozygous mutation and 27 of 144 (19%) were a normal wild-type. In six of 17 (35%) dams, a homozygous mutation of the PNPLA1 genotype was found, eight of 17 (47%) demonstrated a heterozygous mutation and three of 17 (18%) were normal wild-type. Dams with a homozygous mutation were clinically unaffected. A 1 year follow-up revealed that 23 of 28 (82%) puppies affected with this syndrome failed to develop typical signs of ichthyosis. In five of 28 (18%) dogs there was persistence of mild scaling.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL IMPORTANCE

We hypothesize that the clinical syndrome termed "milk crust" could represent a transient form of golden retriever ichthyosis. Remission is not fully linked to PNPLA1 genotype, suggesting that unknown factors may contribute to the clinical disease.

Item Type:

Journal Article (Original Article)

Division/Institute:

05 Veterinary Medicine > Research Foci > DermFocus
05 Veterinary Medicine > Department of Infectious Diseases and Pathobiology (DIP) > Institute of Animal Pathology
05 Veterinary Medicine > Department of Infectious Diseases and Pathobiology (DIP)

UniBE Contributor:

Welle, Monika Maria

Subjects:

600 Technology > 630 Agriculture

ISSN:

0959-4493

Publisher:

Blackwell Science

Language:

English

Submitter:

Barbara Gautschi-Steffen

Date Deposited:

15 Feb 2016 13:36

Last Modified:

17 Feb 2016 11:16

Publisher DOI:

10.1111/vde.12216

PubMed ID:

26178606

BORIS DOI:

10.7892/boris.75557

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/75557

Actions (login required)

Edit item Edit item
Provide Feedback