Frontal areas contribute to reduced global coordination of resting-state gamma activities in drug-naïve patients with schizophrenia

Kikuchi, Mitsuru; Hashimoto, Takanori; Nagasawa, Tatsuya; Hirosawa, Tetsu; Minabe, Yoshio; Yoshimura, Masafumi; Strik, Werner; Dierks, Thomas; König, Thomas (2011). Frontal areas contribute to reduced global coordination of resting-state gamma activities in drug-naïve patients with schizophrenia. Schizophrenia Research, 130(1-3), pp. 187-94. Elsevier 10.1016/j.schres.2011.06.003

[img] Text
7689.pdf - Published Version
Restricted to registered users only
Available under License Publisher holds Copyright.

Download (533kB) | Request a copy

Schizophrenia has been postulated to involve impaired neuronal cooperation in large-scale neural networks, including cortico-cortical circuitry. Alterations in gamma band oscillations have attracted a great deal of interest as they appear to represent a pathophysiological process of cortical dysfunction in schizophrenia. Gamma band oscillations reflect local cortical activities, and the synchronization of these activities among spatially distributed cortical areas has been suggested to play a central role in the formation of networks. To assess global coordination across spatially distributed brain regions, Omega complexity (OC) in multichannel EEG was proposed. Using OC, we investigated global coordination of resting-state EEG activities in both gamma (30–50 Hz) and below-gamma (1.5–30 Hz) bands in drug-naïve patients with schizophrenia and investigated the effects of neuroleptic treatment. We found that gamma band OC was significantly higher in drug-naïve patients with schizophrenia compared to control subjects and that a right frontal electrode (F3) contributed significantly to the higher OC. After neuroleptic treatment, reductions in the contribution of frontal electrodes to global OC in both bands correlated with the improvement of schizophrenia symptomatology. The present study suggests that frontal brain processes in schizophrenia were less coordinated with activity in the remaining brain. In addition, beneficial effects of neuroleptic treatment were accompanied by improvement of brain coordination predominantly due to changes in frontal regions. Our study provides new evidence of improper intrinsic brain integration in schizophrenia by investigating the resting-state gamma band activity.

Item Type:

Journal Article (Original Article)

Division/Institute:

04 Faculty of Medicine > University Psychiatric Services > University Hospital of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy > Psychiatric Neurophysiology (discontinued)
04 Faculty of Medicine > University Psychiatric Services > University Hospital of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy > Management

UniBE Contributor:

Strik, Werner; Dierks, Thomas and König, Thomas

ISSN:

0920-9964

Publisher:

Elsevier

Language:

English

Submitter:

Factscience Import

Date Deposited:

04 Oct 2013 14:22

Last Modified:

22 Dec 2014 00:54

Publisher DOI:

10.1016/j.schres.2011.06.003

PubMed ID:

21696922

Web of Science ID:

000294237700027

BORIS DOI:

10.7892/boris.7689

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/7689 (FactScience: 213006)

Actions (login required)

Edit item Edit item
Provide Feedback