Cognitive binding in schizophrenia: weakened integration of temporal intersensory information

Tschacher, Wolfgang; Bergomi, Claudia (2011). Cognitive binding in schizophrenia: weakened integration of temporal intersensory information. Schizophrenia bulletin, 37(Suppl. 2), S13-22. Oxford: Oxford University Press 10.1093/schbul/sbr074

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Cognitive functioning is based on binding processes, by which different features and elements of neurocognition are integrated and coordinated. Binding is an essential ingredient of, for instance, Gestalt perception. We have implemented a paradigm of causality perception based on the work of Albert Michotte, in which 2 identical discs move from opposite sides of a monitor, steadily toward, and then past one another. Their coincidence generates an ambiguous percept of either "streaming" or "bouncing," which the subjects (34 schizophrenia spectrum patients and 34 controls with mean age 27.9 y) were instructed to report. The latter perception is a marker of the binding processes underlying perceived causality (type I binding). In addition to this visual task, acoustic stimuli were presented at different times during the task (150 ms before and after visual coincidence), which can modulate perceived causality. This modulation by intersensory and temporally delayed stimuli is viewed as a different type of binding (type II). We show here, using a mixed-effects hierarchical analysis, that type II binding distinguishes schizophrenia spectrum patients from healthy controls, whereas type I binding does not. Type I binding may even be excessive in some patients, especially those with positive symptoms; Type II binding, however, was generally attenuated in patients. The present findings point to ways in which the disconnection (or Gestalt) hypothesis of schizophrenia can be refined, suggesting more specific markers of neurocognitive functioning and potential targets of treatment.

Item Type:

Journal Article (Original Article)

Division/Institute:

04 Faculty of Medicine > University Psychiatric Services > University Hospital of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy > Psychotherapy

UniBE Contributor:

Tschacher, Wolfgang and Bergomi, Claudia

ISSN:

0586-7614

Publisher:

Oxford University Press

Language:

English

Submitter:

Factscience Import

Date Deposited:

04 Oct 2013 14:22

Last Modified:

10 Sep 2017 14:53

Publisher DOI:

10.1093/schbul/sbr074

PubMed ID:

21860043

Web of Science ID:

000294557300003

BORIS DOI:

10.7892/boris.7694

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/7694 (FactScience: 213011)

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