Resilience as a correlate of acute stress disorder symptoms in patients with acute myocardial infarction

Meister, Rebecca Elisabeth; Weber, Tania; Princip, Mary; Schnyder, Ulrich; Barth, Jürgen; Znoj, Hansjörg; Schmid, Jean-Paul; von Känel, Roland (2015). Resilience as a correlate of acute stress disorder symptoms in patients with acute myocardial infarction. Open Heart, 2(1), e000261. B M J Group 10.1136/openhrt-2015-000261

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OBJECTIVES Myocardial infarction (MI) may be experienced as a traumatic event causing acute stress disorder (ASD). This mental disorder has an impact on the daily life of patients and is associated with the development of post-traumatic stress disorder. Trait resilience has been shown to be a protective factor for post-traumatic stress disorder, but its association with ASD in patients with MI is elusive and was examined in this study. METHODS We investigated 71 consecutive patients with acute MI within 48 h of having stable haemodynamic conditions established and for 3 months thereafter. All patients completed the Acute Stress Disorder Scale and the Resilience Scale to self-rate the severity of ASD symptoms and trait resilience, respectively. RESULTS Hierarchical regression analysis showed that greater resilience was associated with lower symptoms of ASD independent of covariates (b=-0.22, p<0.05). Post hoc analysis revealed resilience level to be inversely associated with the ASD symptom clusters of re-experiencing (b=-0.05, p<0.05) and arousal (b=-0.09, p<0.05), but not with dissociation and avoidance. CONCLUSIONS The findings suggest that patients with acute MI with higher trait resilience experience relatively fewer symptoms of ASD during MI. Resilience was particularly associated with re-experiencing and arousal symptoms. Our findings contribute to a better understanding of resilience as a potentially important correlate of ASD in the context of traumatic situations such as acute MI. These results emphasise the importance of identifying patients with low resilience in medical settings and to offer them adequate support.

Item Type:

Journal Article (Original Article)

Division/Institute:

04 Faculty of Medicine > Department of Head Organs and Neurology (DKNS) > Clinic of Neurology > Centre of Competence for Psychosomatic Medicine
04 Faculty of Medicine > Pre-clinic Human Medicine > BioMedical Research (DBMR) > DCR Unit Sahli Building > Forschungsgruppe Neurologie
04 Faculty of Medicine > Department of Head Organs and Neurology (DKNS) > Clinic of Neurology
04 Faculty of Medicine > Department of Cardiovascular Disorders (DHGE) > Clinic of Cardiology
04 Faculty of Medicine > Pre-clinic Human Medicine > Institute of Anatomy
04 Faculty of Medicine > Medical Education > Institute of General Practice and Primary Care (BIHAM)

UniBE Contributor:

Meister, Rebecca Elisabeth; Weber, Tania; Princip, Mary; Barth, Jürgen; Schmid, Jean-Paul and von Känel, Roland

Subjects:

600 Technology > 610 Medicine & health
300 Social sciences, sociology & anthropology > 360 Social problems & social services

ISSN:

2053-3624

Publisher:

B M J Group

Language:

English

Submitter:

Romina Theiler

Date Deposited:

15 Mar 2016 14:06

Last Modified:

10 Sep 2017 13:21

Publisher DOI:

10.1136/openhrt-2015-000261

PubMed ID:

26568834

Uncontrolled Keywords:

Coronary Artery Disease

BORIS DOI:

10.7892/boris.76961

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/76961

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