Association of Trait Resilience With Peritraumatic and Posttraumatic Stress in Patients With Myocardial Infarction.

Meister, Rebecca Elisabeth; Princip, Mary; Schnyder, Ulrich; Barth, Jürgen; Znoj, Hans Jörg; Schmid, Jean-Paul; Wittmann, Lutz; von Känel, Roland (2015). Association of Trait Resilience With Peritraumatic and Posttraumatic Stress in Patients With Myocardial Infarction. Psychosomatic medicine, 78(3), pp. 327-334. Lippincott Williams & Wilkins 10.1097/PSY.0000000000000278

[img] Text
00006842-900000000-99003.pdf - Published Version
Restricted to registered users only
Available under License Publisher holds Copyright.

Download (158kB) | Request a copy

OBJECTIVE Acute myocardial infarction (MI) is a life-threatening condition, leading to immediate fear and distress in many patients. Approximately 18% of patients develop posttraumatic stress disorder in the aftermath of MI. Trait resilience has shown to be a protective factor for the development of posttraumatic stress disorder. However, whether this buffering effect has already an impact on peritraumatic distress and applies to patients with MI is elusive. METHODS We investigated 98 consecutive patients with acute MI within 48 hours after having reached stable circulatory conditions and 3 months thereafter. Peritraumatic distress was assessed retrospectively with three single-item questions about pain, fear, and helplessness during MI. All patients completed the Posttraumatic Diagnostic Scale (PDS) and the Resilience Scale to self-rate posttraumatic stress and trait resilience. RESULTS Multivariate models adjusting for sociodemographic and medical factors showed that trait resilience was not associated with peritraumatic distress, but significantly so with posttraumatic stress. Patients with greater trait resilience showed lower PDS scores (b = -0.06, p < .001). There was no significant relationship between peritraumatic distress scores and PDS scores; resilience did not emerge as a moderator of this relationship. CONCLUSIONS The findings suggest that trait resilience does not buffer the perception of acute MI as stressful per se but may enhance better coping with the traumatic experience in the longer term, thus preventing the development of MI-associated posttraumatic stress. Trait resilience may play an important role in posttraumatic stress symptoms triggered by medical diseases such as acute MI.

Item Type:

Journal Article (Original Article)

Division/Institute:

07 Faculty of Human Sciences > Institute of Psychology > Clinical Psychology and Psychotherapy
04 Faculty of Medicine > Department of Head Organs and Neurology (DKNS) > Clinic of Neurology > Centre of Competence for Psychosomatic Medicine
04 Faculty of Medicine > Other Institutions > Teaching Staff, Faculty of Medicine
04 Faculty of Medicine > Pre-clinic Human Medicine > BioMedical Research (DBMR) > DCR Unit Sahli Building > Forschungsgruppe Neurologie
04 Faculty of Medicine > Department of Head Organs and Neurology (DKNS) > Clinic of Neurology
04 Faculty of Medicine > Department of Cardiovascular Disorders (DHGE) > Clinic of Cardiology
04 Faculty of Medicine > Medical Education > Institute of General Practice and Primary Care (BIHAM)

UniBE Contributor:

Meister, Rebecca Elisabeth; Princip, Mary; Barth, Jürgen; Znoj, Hans Jörg; Schmid, Jean-Paul and von Känel, Roland

Subjects:

600 Technology > 610 Medicine & health
700 Arts > 790 Sports, games & entertainment
300 Social sciences, sociology & anthropology > 360 Social problems & social services

ISSN:

0033-3174

Publisher:

Lippincott Williams & Wilkins

Language:

English

Submitter:

Romina Theiler

Date Deposited:

15 Feb 2016 15:39

Last Modified:

26 Jun 2016 02:12

Publisher DOI:

10.1097/PSY.0000000000000278

PubMed ID:

26599911

BORIS DOI:

10.7892/boris.76988

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/76988

Actions (login required)

Edit item Edit item
Provide Feedback