Hypercoagulation and hyperkinetic blood pressure indicative of physiological loss-of-control despite behavioural control in Africans: The SABPA study.

Scheepers, Jacobus De Wet; Malan, Leoné; de Kock, Andrea; Malan, Nicolaas Theodor; Cockeran, Marike; von Känel, Roland (2016). Hypercoagulation and hyperkinetic blood pressure indicative of physiological loss-of-control despite behavioural control in Africans: The SABPA study. Blood pressure, 25(4), pp. 1-9. Taylor & Francis 10.3109/08037051.2015.1131432

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OBJECTIVES A dissociation between behavioural (in-control) and physiological parameters (indicating loss-of-control) is associated with cardiovascular risk in defensive coping (DefS) Africans. We evaluated relationships between DefS, sub-clinical atherosclerosis, low-grade inflammation and hypercoagulation in a bi-ethnic sex cohort. METHODS Black (Africans) and white Africans (Caucasians) (n = 375; aged 44.6 ± 9.7 years) were included. Ambulatory BP, vascular structure (left carotid cross-sectional wall area (L-CSWA) and plaque counts), and markers of coagulation and inflammation were quantified. Ethnicity/coping style interaction was revealed only in DefS participants. RESULTS A hypertensive state, less plaque, low-grade inflammation, and hypercoagulation were more prevalent in DefS Africans (27-84%) than DefS Caucasians (18-41%). Regression analyses demonstrated associations between L-CSWA and 24 hour systolic BP (R(2) = 0.38; β = 0.78; p < 0.05) in DefS African men but not in DefS African women or Caucasians. No associations between L-CSWA and coagulation markers were evident. CONCLUSION Novel findings revealed hypercoagulation, low-grade inflammation and hyperkinetic BP (physiological loss-of-control responses) in DefS African men. Coupled to a self-reported in-control DefS behavioural profile, this reflects dissociation between behaviour and physiology. It may explain changes in vascular structure, increasing cerebrovascular disease risk in a state of hyper-vigilant coping.

Item Type:

Journal Article (Original Article)

Division/Institute:

04 Faculty of Medicine > Pre-clinic Human Medicine > BioMedical Research (DBMR) > DCR Unit Sahli Building > Forschungsgruppe Neurologie

UniBE Contributor:

von Känel, Roland

ISSN:

0803-7051

Publisher:

Taylor & Francis

Language:

English

Submitter:

Romina Theiler

Date Deposited:

10 May 2016 15:39

Last Modified:

10 Jul 2016 02:05

Publisher DOI:

10.3109/08037051.2015.1131432

PubMed ID:

26806201

Uncontrolled Keywords:

Africans; Coagulation; Coping; Dissociation; Structural vascular disease; Vascular remodelling

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/77076

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