Sequestration of plant secondary metabolites by insect herbivores: molecular mechanisms and ecological consequences

Erb, Matthias; Robert, Christelle A. M. (2016). Sequestration of plant secondary metabolites by insect herbivores: molecular mechanisms and ecological consequences. Current Opinion in Insect Science, 14, pp. 8-11. Elsevier 10.1016/j.cois.2015.11.005

[img] Text
CurrOpinInsectSci_14_8.pdf - Published Version
Restricted to registered users only
Available under License Publisher holds Copyright.

Download (276kB) | Request a copy

Numerous insect herbivores can take up and store plant toxins as self-defense against their own natural enemies. Plant toxin sequestration is tightly linked with tolerance strategies that keep the toxins functional. Specific transporters have been identified that likely allow the herbivore to control the spatiotemporal dynamics of toxin accumulation. Certain herbivores furthermore possess specific enzymes to boost the bioactivity of the sequestered toxins. Ecologists have studied plant toxin sequestration for decades. The recently uncovered molecular mechanisms in combination with transient, non-transgenic systems to manipulate insect gene expression will help to understand the importance of toxin sequestration for food-web dynamics in nature.

Item Type:

Journal Article (Original Article)

Division/Institute:

08 Faculty of Science > Department of Biology > Institute of Plant Sciences (IPS)
08 Faculty of Science > Department of Biology > Institute of Plant Sciences (IPS) > Biotic Interactions

UniBE Contributor:

Erb, Matthias and Robert, Christelle Aurélie Maud

Subjects:

500 Science > 580 Plants (Botany)

ISSN:

2214-5745

Publisher:

Elsevier

Language:

English

Submitter:

Peter Alfred von Ballmoos-Haas

Date Deposited:

31 Mar 2016 11:17

Last Modified:

28 Feb 2018 10:45

Publisher DOI:

10.1016/j.cois.2015.11.005

BORIS DOI:

10.7892/boris.77103

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/77103

Actions (login required)

Edit item Edit item
Provide Feedback