Thyroid dysfunction and anemia in a large population-based study.

M'rabet Bensalah, Khadija; Aubert, Carole E; Coslovsky, Michael; Collet, Tinh-Hai; Baumgartner, Christine; den Elzen, Wendy P J; Luben, Robert; Angelillo-Scherrer, Anne; Aujesky, Drahomir; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Rodondi, Nicolas (2016). Thyroid dysfunction and anemia in a large population-based study. Clinical endocrinology, 84(4), pp. 627-631. Blackwell Scientific Publications 10.1111/cen.12994

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OBJECTIVE AND BACKGROUND

Anemia and thyroid dysfunction are common and often co-occur. Current guidelines recommend the assessment of thyroid function in the work-up of anemia, although evidence on this association is scarce.

PATIENTS AND METHODS

In the "European Prospective Investigation of Cancer" (EPIC)-Norfolk population-based cohort, we aimed to examine the prevalence and type of anemia (defined as hemoglobin <13 g/dl for men and <12 g/dl for women) according to different thyroid function groups.

RESULTS

The mean age of the 8791 participants was 59.4 (SD 9.1) years and 55.2% were women. Thyroid dysfunction was present in 437 (5.0%) and anemia in 517 (5.9%) participants. After excluding 121 participants with three most common causes of anemia (chronic kidney disease, inflammation, iron deficiency), anemia was found in 4.7% of euthyroid participants. Compared with the euthyroid group, the prevalence of anemia was significantly higher in overt hyperthyroidism (14.6%, P < .01), higher with borderline significance in overt hypothyroidism (7.7%, P = .05) and not increased in subclinical thyroid dysfunction (5.0% in subclinical hypothyroidism, 3.3% in subclinical hyperthyroidism). Anemia associated with thyroid dysfunction was mainly normocytic (94.0%), and rarely macrocytic (6.0%).

CONCLUSION

The prevalence of anemia was higher in overt hyperthyroidism, but not increased in subclinical thyroid dysfunction. Systematic measurement of thyroid-stimulating hormone in anemic patients is likely to be useful only after excluding common causes of anemia.

Item Type:

Journal Article (Original Article)

Division/Institute:

04 Faculty of Medicine > Pre-clinic Human Medicine > CTU Bern
04 Faculty of Medicine > Department of Haematology, Oncology, Infectious Diseases, Laboratory Medicine and Hospital Pharmacy (DOLS) > Clinic of Haematology and Central Haematological Laboratory
04 Faculty of Medicine > Department of General Internal Medicine (DAIM) > Clinic of General Internal Medicine
04 Faculty of Medicine > Department of General Internal Medicine (DAIM) > Clinic of General Internal Medicine > Centre of Competence for General Internal Medicine
04 Faculty of Medicine > Pre-clinic Human Medicine > BioMedical Research (DBMR) > Unit Childrens Hospital > Forschungsgruppe Hämatologie (Erwachsene)

UniBE Contributor:

M'rabet Bensalah, Khadija; Aubert, Carole Elodie; Coslovsky, Michael; Baumgartner, Christine; Angelillo, Anne; Aujesky, Drahomir and Rodondi, Nicolas

Subjects:

600 Technology > 610 Medicine & health
300 Social sciences, sociology & anthropology > 360 Social problems & social services

ISSN:

0300-0664

Publisher:

Blackwell Scientific Publications

Language:

English

Submitter:

Jacques Donzé

Date Deposited:

23 Feb 2016 16:29

Last Modified:

18 Sep 2020 10:56

Publisher DOI:

10.1111/cen.12994

PubMed ID:

26662849

Uncontrolled Keywords:

Anemia; Hyperthyroidism; Hypothyroidism; Thyroid diseases

BORIS DOI:

10.7892/boris.77309

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/77309

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