Subclinical Thyroid Dysfunction and Frailty Among Older Men

Virgini, Vanessa Sophie; Rodondi, Nicolas; Cawthon, Peggy M; Harrison, Stephanie Litwack; Hoffman, Andrew R; Orwoll, Eric S; Ensrud, Kristine E; Bauer, Douglas C (2015). Subclinical Thyroid Dysfunction and Frailty Among Older Men. The Journal of clinical endocrinology and metabolism, 100(12), pp. 4524-4532. The Endocrine Society 10.1210/jc.2015-3191

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CONTEXT Both subclinical thyroid dysfunction and frailty are common among older individuals, but data on the relationship between these 2 conditions are conflicting. OBJECTIVE The purpose of this study was to assess the cross-sectional and prospective associations between subclinical thyroid dysfunction and frailty and the 5 frailty subdomains (sarcopenia, weakness, slowness, exhaustion, and low activity). SETTING AND DESIGN The Osteoporotic Fractures in Men Study is a prospective cohort study. PARTICIPANTS Men older than 65 years (n = 1455) were classified into 3 groups of thyroid status: subclinical hyperthyroidism (n = 26, 1.8%), subclinical hypothyroidism (n = 102, 7.0%), and euthyroidism (n = 1327, 91.2%). MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES Frailty was defined using a slightly modified Cardiovascular Health Study Index: men with 3 or more criteria were considered frail, men with 1 to 2 criteria were considered intermediately frail, and men with no criteria were considered robust. We assessed the cross-sectional relationship between baseline thyroid function and the 3 categories of frailty status (robust/intermediate/frail) as well as the prospective association between baseline thyroid function and subsequent frailty status and mortality after a 5-year follow-up. RESULTS At baseline, compared with euthyroid participants, men with subclinical hyperthyroidism had an increased likelihood of greater frailty status (adjusted odds ratio, 2.48; 95% confidence interval, 1.15-5.34), particularly among men aged <74 years at baseline (odds ratio for frailty, 3.63; 95% confidence interval, 1.21-10.88). After 5 years of follow-up, baseline subclinical hypothyroidism and hyperthyroidism were not consistently associated with overall frailty status or frailty components. CONCLUSION Among community-dwelling older men, subclinical hyperthyroidism, but not subclinical hypothyroidism, is associated with increased odds of prevalent but not incident frailty.

Item Type:

Journal Article (Original Article)

Division/Institute:

04 Faculty of Medicine > Department of General Internal Medicine (DAIM) > Clinic of General Internal Medicine
04 Faculty of Medicine > Department of General Internal Medicine (DAIM) > Clinic of General Internal Medicine > Centre of Competence for General Internal Medicine

UniBE Contributor:

Virgini, Vanessa Sophie and Rodondi, Nicolas

Subjects:

600 Technology > 610 Medicine & health

ISSN:

1945-7197

Publisher:

The Endocrine Society

Language:

English

Submitter:

Jacques Donzé

Date Deposited:

23 Mar 2016 10:27

Last Modified:

26 Mar 2016 11:52

Publisher DOI:

10.1210/jc.2015-3191

PubMed ID:

26495751

BORIS DOI:

10.7892/boris.77319

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/77319

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