Cervical spinal locking plate in combination with cortical ring allograft for a one level fusion in dogs with cervical spondylotic myelopathy.

Bergman, Robert L; Levine, Jonathan M; Coates, Joan R; Bahr, Anne; Hettlich, Bianca Felicitas; Kerwin, Sharon C (2008). Cervical spinal locking plate in combination with cortical ring allograft for a one level fusion in dogs with cervical spondylotic myelopathy. Veterinary surgery, 37(6), pp. 530-536. Wiley-Blackwell 10.1111/j.1532-950X.2008.00400.x

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OBJECTIVE To evaluate use of a surgical technique commonly used in humans for treatment of cervical spondylotic myelopathy (CSM) in dogs. DESIGN Prospective case series. ANIMALS Dogs with CSM (n=10). METHODS Dogs weighing >30 kg that had CSM at 1 vertebral articulation were eligible for inclusion. Dogs had vertebral column distraction/fusion performed using a cortical ring allograft, cancellous autograft, and a spinal locking plate. Dogs were evaluated temporally by repeat neurological examinations and by client perception of postsurgical outcome, determined by telephone interview. RESULTS Nine dogs survived the immediate postoperative period. Seven of 8 dogs had moderate to complete improvement without recurrence (mean follow-up, 2.48 years). The most common postsurgical complications were screw loosening (n=4) and plate shifting (2), neither of which required surgical revision. One dog had pseudoarthrosis that may have negatively impacted outcome. CONCLUSION Treatment of single level CSM in dogs with ring allograft and a spinal locking plate system may lead to successful outcomes. The major problems encountered with included cost of the implants and adjusting the system designed for humans to fit the vertebral column of a dog. CLINICAL RELEVANCE For dogs with CSM at a single level, the use of a spinal locking plate in combination with a cortical ring allograft can be an effective surgical treatment. Costs of the implants as well as anatomic differences in dogs make this type of surgery less appealing.

Item Type:

Journal Article (Original Article)

Division/Institute:

05 Veterinary Medicine > Department of Clinical Veterinary Medicine (DKV)
05 Veterinary Medicine > Department of Clinical Veterinary Medicine (DKV) > Small Animal Clinic > Small Animal Clinic, Surgery
05 Veterinary Medicine > Department of Clinical Veterinary Medicine (DKV) > Small Animal Clinic

UniBE Contributor:

Hettlich, Bianca Felicitas

Subjects:

500 Science
600 Technology > 610 Medicine & health

ISSN:

0161-3499

Publisher:

Wiley-Blackwell

Language:

English

Submitter:

Bianca Felicitas Hettlich

Date Deposited:

30 Mar 2016 16:56

Last Modified:

30 Mar 2016 16:56

Publisher DOI:

10.1111/j.1532-950X.2008.00400.x

PubMed ID:

19134102

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/77354

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