Outcomes of Infants Starting Antiretroviral Therapy in Southern Africa, 2004-2012.

Porter, Mireille; Davies, Mary-Ann; Mapani, Muntanga K; Rabie, Helena; Phiri, Sam; Nuttall, James; Fairlie, Lee; Technau, Karl-Günter; Stinson, Kathryn; Wood, Robin; Wellington, Maureen; Haas, Andreas D; Giddy, Janet; Tanser, Frank; Eley, Brian (2015). Outcomes of Infants Starting Antiretroviral Therapy in Southern Africa, 2004-2012. Journal of acquired immune deficiency syndromes JAIDS, 69(5), pp. 593-601. Lippincott Williams & Wilkins 10.1097/QAI.0000000000000683

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BACKGROUND There are limited published data on the outcomes of infants starting antiretroviral therapy (ART) in routine care in Southern Africa. This study aimed to examine the baseline characteristics and outcomes of infants initiating ART. METHODS We analyzed prospectively collected cohort data from routine ART initiation in infants from 11 cohorts contributing to the International Epidemiologic Database to Evaluate AIDS in Southern Africa. We included ART-naive HIV-infected infants aged <12 months initiating ≥3 antiretroviral drugs between 2004 and 2012. Kaplan-Meier estimates were calculated for mortality, loss to follow-up (LTFU), transfer out, and virological suppression. We used Cox proportional hazard models stratified by cohort to determine baseline characteristics associated with outcomes mortality and virological suppression. RESULTS The median (interquartile range) age at ART initiation of 4945 infants was 5.9 months (3.7-8.7) with follow-up of 11.2 months (2.8-20.0). At ART initiation, 77% had WHO clinical stage 3 or 4 disease and 87% were severely immunosuppressed. Three-year mortality probability was 16% and LTFU 29%. Severe immunosuppression, WHO stage 3 or 4, anemia, being severely underweight, and initiation of treatment before 2010 were associated with higher mortality. At 12 months after ART initiation, 17% of infants were severely immunosuppressed and the probability of attaining virological suppression was 56%. CONCLUSIONS Most infants initiating ART in Southern Africa had severe disease with high probability of LTFU and mortality on ART. Although the majority of infants remaining in care showed immune recovery and virological suppression, these responses were suboptimal.

Item Type:

Journal Article (Original Article)

Division/Institute:

04 Faculty of Medicine > Pre-clinic Human Medicine > Institute of Social and Preventive Medicine (ISPM)

Graduate School:

Graduate School for Health Sciences (GHS)

UniBE Contributor:

Haas, Andreas

Subjects:

600 Technology > 610 Medicine & health
300 Social sciences, sociology & anthropology > 360 Social problems & social services

ISSN:

0894-9255

Publisher:

Lippincott Williams & Wilkins

Language:

English

Submitter:

Doris Kopp Heim

Date Deposited:

12 Feb 2016 10:48

Last Modified:

16 Aug 2016 02:30

Publisher DOI:

10.1097/QAI.0000000000000683

PubMed ID:

26167620

BORIS DOI:

10.7892/boris.77387

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/77387

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