Microbiota at teeth and implants in partially edentulous patients. A 10-year retrospective study.

Eick, Sigrun; Ramseier, Christoph Andreas; Rothenberger, Kathrin; Brägger, Urs; Buser, Daniel; Salvi, Giovanni Edoardo (2016). Microbiota at teeth and implants in partially edentulous patients. A 10-year retrospective study. Clinical oral implants research, 27(2), pp. 218-225. Wiley-Blackwell 10.1111/clr.12588

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OBJECTIVE To determine the microbiota at implants and adjacent teeth 10 years after placement of implants with a sandblasted and acid-etched surface. MATERIAL AND METHODS Plaque samples obtained from the deepest sites of 504 implants and of 493 adjacent teeth were analyzed for certain bacterial species associated with periodontitis, for staphylococci, for aerobic gram-negative rods, and for yeasts using nucleic acid-based methods. RESULTS Species known to be associated with periodontitis were detectable at 6.2-78.4% of the implants. Significantly higher counts at implants in comparison with teeth were assessed for Tannerella forsythia, Parvimonas micra, Fusobacterium nucleatum/necrophorum, and Campylobacter rectus. Higher counts of periodontopathogenic species were detectable at implants of current smokers than at those of non-smokers. In addition, those species were found in higher quantities at implants of subjects with periodontitis. The prevalence of Prevotella intermedia, Treponema denticola, C. rectus, and moreover of Staphylococcus warneri might be associated with peri-implant inflammation. Selected staphylococcal species (not Staphylococcus aureus), aerobic gram-negative rods, and yeasts were frequently detected, but with the exception of S. warneri, they did not show any association with periodontal or peri-implant diseases. CONCLUSIONS Smoking and periodontal disease are risk factors for colonization of periodontopathic bacteria at implants. Those bacterial species may play a potential role in peri-implant inflammation. The role of S. warneri needs further validation.

Item Type:

Journal Article (Original Article)

Division/Institute:

04 Faculty of Medicine > School of Dental Medicine > Department of Periodontology
04 Faculty of Medicine > School of Dental Medicine > Department of Oral Surgery and Stomatology
04 Faculty of Medicine > School of Dental Medicine > School of Dental Medicine, Periodontics Research

UniBE Contributor:

Eick, Sigrun; Ramseier, Christoph Andreas; Brägger, Urs; Buser, Daniel and Salvi, Giovanni Edoardo

Subjects:

600 Technology > 610 Medicine & health

ISSN:

0905-7161

Publisher:

Wiley-Blackwell

Language:

English

Submitter:

Eveline Carmen Schuler

Date Deposited:

07 Apr 2016 09:41

Last Modified:

09 Sep 2017 19:56

Publisher DOI:

10.1111/clr.12588

PubMed ID:

25827437

Uncontrolled Keywords:

dental implants, long-term follow-up, microbiota, mucositis, peri-implantitis

BORIS DOI:

10.7892/boris.77414

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/77414

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