Does Trauma Impair Self-Control? Differences in Delaying Gratification Between Former Indentured Child Laborers and Nontraumatized Controls.

Simmen-Janevska, Keti; Forstmeier, Simon; Krammer, Sandy; Maercker, Andreas (2015). Does Trauma Impair Self-Control? Differences in Delaying Gratification Between Former Indentured Child Laborers and Nontraumatized Controls. Violence and victims, 30(6), pp. 1068-1081. Springer 10.1891/0886-6708.VV-D-13-00174

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Traumatic experiences may affect an individual's ability to exercise self-control, which is an essential characteristic for successfully managing life. As a measure of self-control, we used the delay discounting paradigm, that is, the extent to which a person devalues delayed gratification. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between childhood trauma and delay discounting using a control group design with elderly participants with a mean age of 76.2 years. Swiss former indentured child laborers (n=103) who had been exposed to trauma during their childhood were compared with nontraumatized controls (n=50). The trauma exposure group showed a considerably higher preference for immediate smaller rewards than the controls, indicating their lower self-control. A hierarchical regression analysis revealed that a history of abuse, current self-efficacy, and education were significantly associated with delay discounting. Implications for future research are discussed.

Item Type:

Journal Article (Review Article)

Division/Institute:

04 Faculty of Medicine > Service Sector > Institute of Legal Medicine
04 Faculty of Medicine > Service Sector > Institute of Legal Medicine > Forensic Psychiatric Services

UniBE Contributor:

Krammer, Sandy

Subjects:

600 Technology > 610 Medicine & health

ISSN:

0886-6708

Publisher:

Springer

Language:

English

Submitter:

Antoinette Angehrn

Date Deposited:

07 Mar 2016 08:19

Last Modified:

20 Apr 2016 11:27

Publisher DOI:

10.1891/0886-6708.VV-D-13-00174

PubMed ID:

26440574

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/77442

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