The continuum of intestinal CD4+ T cell adaptations in host-microbial mutualism

Geuking, Markus B; McCoy, Kathy D; Macpherson, Andrew J (2011). The continuum of intestinal CD4+ T cell adaptations in host-microbial mutualism. Gut microbes, 2(6), pp. 353-357. Austin, Tex.: Landes Bioscience 10.4161/gmic.18604

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How a mutualistic relationship between the intestinal microbiota and intestinal T cell compartments is established is important, as a breakdown of intestinal T cell homeostasis may cause inflammatory bowel diseases. A number of studies have shown that different bacterial species modulate the intestinal CD4+ T cell compartment in different ways. We performed mechanistic in vivo studies that demonstrated the crucial requirement for regulatory T cells (Treg) and interleukin-10 (IL-10) in the induction of intestinal T cell homeostasis even following colonization with a completely benign microbiota. In the absence of a functional Treg response or IL-10 receptor signaling, the same bacteria that induced a Treg response in wild-type animals now induced T helper type 17 responses, without intestinal inflammation. Therefore, Treg, IL-10 and Th17 are crucial regulatory mechanisms in the intestine not only for controlling inflammation, but also to establish a continuum of CD4+ T cell homeostasis upon commensal colonization.

Item Type:

Journal Article (Original Article)

Division/Institute:

04 Faculty of Medicine > Department of Gastro-intestinal, Liver and Lung Disorders (DMLL) > Clinic of Visceral Surgery and Medicine > Gastroenterology
04 Faculty of Medicine > Department of Gastro-intestinal, Liver and Lung Disorders (DMLL) > Clinic of Visceral Surgery and Medicine > Visceral Surgery

UniBE Contributor:

Geuking, Markus; McCoy, Kathleen and Macpherson, Andrew

ISSN:

1949-0976

Publisher:

Landes Bioscience

Language:

English

Submitter:

Factscience Import

Date Deposited:

04 Oct 2013 14:22

Last Modified:

08 Jun 2016 10:25

Publisher DOI:

10.4161/gmic.18604

PubMed ID:

22157235

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/7750 (FactScience: 213076)

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