Synchronous Holocene climatic oscillations recorded on the Swiss Plateau and at timberline in the Alps

Haas, Jean Nicolas; Richoz, Isabelle; Tinner, Willy; Wick, Lucia (1998). Synchronous Holocene climatic oscillations recorded on the Swiss Plateau and at timberline in the Alps. Holocene, 8(3), pp. 301-309. Sage 10.1191/095968398675491173

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Eight synchronous pre-Roman cold phases were found at 9600–9200, 8600–8150, 7550–6900, 6600– 6200, 5350–4900, 4600–4400, 3500–3200 and 2600–2350 radiocarbon years BP by reconstructing past climate at two sites on the Swiss Plateau and at timberline in the Alps. The cooling events during the early-and mid-Holocene represent temperature values similar to today, and apparently the onset of cooling events represents a deviation from today's mean annual temperature of about 1°C and is triggered at a 1000-year periodicity. At Wallisellen-Langachermoos (440 m), a former oligotrophic lake near Zürich, the correlation between sum mertime lake levels and the seed production of the amphi-Atlantic aquatic plantNajas flexilis was used to reconstruct lake levels over a 3000-year period during the first part of the Holocene. At Lake Seedorf on the western Swiss Plateau (609 m) the sedimentological, palynological and macrofossil record revealed fluctuations of lake levels for the complete Holocene. From Lago Basso in the southern Alps (2250 m, Val San Giacomo near Splügen Pass, Northern Italy) the terrestrial plant macrofossils – especiallyPinus cembra andLarix – allowed the reconstruction of timberline fluctuations controlled by climate. A similar climatic pattern was found at Gouillé Rion pond in the central Swiss Alps (2343 m, Val d'Hérémence) with plant macrofossils and pollen concentrations and percentages. We postulate that these climatic events are detectable throughout central Europe by independent methods in combination with precise AMS-radiocarbon datings on terrestrial plant remains. Our data fit other proxy records of regional climatic change, such as cool intervals from Greenland ice cores, glacier movements in the Swiss and Austrian Alps, and dendro-densitometry on subfossil wood, as well as the palaeoclimatic data from the Jura Mountains of France obtained by sedimentological analyses. Thus our data indicate that the Northern Hemisphere climate was less stable during the Holocene than previously believed.

Item Type:

Journal Article (Original Article)

Division/Institute:

08 Faculty of Science > Department of Biology > Institute of Plant Sciences (IPS) > Palaeoecology
08 Faculty of Science > Department of Biology > Institute of Plant Sciences (IPS)

UniBE Contributor:

Tinner, Willy

Subjects:

500 Science > 580 Plants (Botany)

ISSN:

0959-6836

Publisher:

Sage

Language:

English

Submitter:

Peter Alfred von Ballmoos-Haas

Date Deposited:

11 Mar 2016 12:25

Last Modified:

20 May 2016 13:04

Publisher DOI:

10.1191/095968398675491173

Uncontrolled Keywords:

Palaeoclimate; Holocene; central Europe; Switzerland; timberline; plant macrofossils; hydrophytes; Najas flexilis

BORIS DOI:

10.7892/boris.77673

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/77673

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