Thrombosis during pregnancy: Risks, prevention, and treatment for mother and fetus--harvesting the power of omic technology, biomarkers and in vitro or in vivo models to facilitate the treatment of thrombosis

Ornaghi, Sara; Müller, Martin; Barnea, Eytan R; Paidas, Michael J (2015). Thrombosis during pregnancy: Risks, prevention, and treatment for mother and fetus--harvesting the power of omic technology, biomarkers and in vitro or in vivo models to facilitate the treatment of thrombosis. Birth Defects Research. Part C: Embryo Today : Reviews, 105(3), pp. 209-225. Wiley 10.1002/bdrc.21103

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Maternal thromboembolism and a spectrum of placenta-mediated complications including the pre-eclampsia syndromes, fetal growth restriction, fetal loss, and abruption manifest a shared etiopathogenesis and predisposing risk factors. Furthermore, these maternal and fetal complications are often linked to subsequent maternal health consequences that comprise the metabolic syndrome, namely, thromboembolism, chronic hypertension, and type II diabetes. Traditionally, several lines of evidence have linked vasoconstriction, excessive thrombosis and inflammation, and impaired trophoblast invasion at the uteroplacental interface as hallmark features of the placental complications. "Omic" technologies and biomarker development have been largely based upon advances in vascular biology, improved understanding of the molecular basis and biochemical pathways responsible for the clinically relevant diseases, and increasingly robust large cohort and/or registry based studies. Advances in understanding of innate and adaptive immunity appear to play an important role in several pregnancy complications. Strategies aimed at improving prediction of these pregnancy complications are often incorporating hemodynamic blood flow data using non-invasive imaging technologies of the utero-placental and maternal circulations early in pregnancy. Some evidence suggests that a multiple marker approach will yield the best performing prediction tools, which may then in turn offer the possibility of early intervention to prevent or ameliorate these pregnancy complications. Prediction of maternal cardiovascular and non-cardiovascular consequences following pregnancy represents an important area of future research, which may have significant public health consequences not only for cardiovascular disease, but also for a variety of other disorders, such as autoimmune and neurodegenerative diseases.

Item Type:

Journal Article (Review Article)

Division/Institute:

04 Faculty of Medicine > Department of Gynaecology, Paediatrics and Endocrinology (DFKE) > Clinic of Gynaecology

UniBE Contributor:

Müller, Martin

Subjects:

600 Technology > 610 Medicine & health

ISSN:

1542-9768

Publisher:

Wiley

Language:

English

Submitter:

Monika Zehr

Date Deposited:

31 Mar 2016 14:46

Last Modified:

11 Nov 2016 08:44

Publisher DOI:

10.1002/bdrc.21103

PubMed ID:

26403978

Uncontrolled Keywords:

biomarkers; embryo signaling; omics; pregnancy; thrombosis

BORIS DOI:

10.7892/boris.77692

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/77692

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