Review: leucocyte-endothelial cell crosstalk at the blood-brain barrier: a prerequisite for successful immune cell entry to the brain

Greenwood, J; Heasman, S J; Alvarez, J I; Prat, A; Lyck, R; Engelhardt, B (2011). Review: leucocyte-endothelial cell crosstalk at the blood-brain barrier: a prerequisite for successful immune cell entry to the brain. Neuropathology & applied neurobiology, 37(1), pp. 24-39. Oxford: Blackwell Scientific Publications 10.1111/j.1365-2990.2010.01140.x

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Leucocyte migration into the central nervous system is a key stage in the development of multiple sclerosis. While much has been learnt regarding the sequential steps of leucocyte capture, adhesion and migration across the vasculature, the molecular basis of leucocyte extravasation is only just being unravelled. It is now recognized that bidirectional crosstalk between the immune cell and endothelium is an essential element in mediating diapedesis during both normal immune surveillance and under inflammatory conditions. The induction of various signalling networks, through engagement of cell surface molecules such as integrins on the leucocyte and immunoglobulin superfamily cell adhesion molecules on the endothelial cell, play a major role in determining the pattern and route of leucocyte emigration. In this review we discuss the extent of our knowledge regarding leucocyte migration across the blood-brain barrier and in particular the endothelial cell signalling pathways contributing to this process.

Item Type:

Journal Article (Further Contribution)

Division/Institute:

04 Faculty of Medicine > Pre-clinic Human Medicine > Theodor Kocher Institute

UniBE Contributor:

Lyck, Ruth and Engelhardt, Britta

ISSN:

0305-1846

Publisher:

Blackwell Scientific Publications

Language:

English

Submitter:

Factscience Import

Date Deposited:

04 Oct 2013 14:23

Last Modified:

06 Dec 2013 13:28

Publisher DOI:

10.1111/j.1365-2990.2010.01140.x

PubMed ID:

20946472

Web of Science ID:

000286062500003

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/7796 (FactScience: 213132)

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