Experimental subarachnoid hemorrhage causes early and long-lasting microarterial constriction and microthrombosis: an in-vivo microscopy study

Friedrich, Benjamin; Müller, Frank; Feiler, Sergej; Schöller, Karsten; Plesnila, Nikolaus (2012). Experimental subarachnoid hemorrhage causes early and long-lasting microarterial constriction and microthrombosis: an in-vivo microscopy study. Journal of cerebral blood flow and metabolism, 32(3), pp. 447-55. New York, N.Y.: Nature Publishing Group 10.1038/jcbfm.2011.154

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Early brain injury (EBI) after subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) is characterized by a severe, cerebral perfusion pressure (CPP)-independent reduction in cerebral blood flow suggesting alterations on the level of cerebral microvessels. Therefore, we aimed to use in-vivo imaging to investigate the cerebral microcirculation after experimental SAH. Subarachnoid hemorrhage was induced in C57/BL6 mice by endovascular perforation. Pial arterioles and venules (10 to 80 μm diameter) were examined using in-vivo fluorescence microscopy, 3, 6, and 72 hours after SAH. Venular diameter or flow was not affected by SAH, while >70% of arterioles constricted by 22% to 33% up to 3 days after hemorrhage (P<0.05 versus sham). The smaller the investigated arterioles, the more pronounced the constriction (r(2)=0.92, P<0.04). Approximately 30% of constricted arterioles were occluded by microthrombi and the frequency of arteriolar microthrombosis correlated with the degree of constriction (r(2)=0.93, P<0.03). The current study demonstrates that SAH induces microarterial constrictions and microthrombosis in vivo. These findings may explain the early CPP-independent decrease in cerebral blood flow after SAH and may therefore serve as novel targets for the treatment of early perfusion deficits after SAH.

Item Type:

Journal Article (Original Article)

Division/Institute:

04 Faculty of Medicine > Department of Head Organs and Neurology (DKNS) > Clinic of Neurosurgery

UniBE Contributor:

Feiler, Serge

ISSN:

0271-678X

Publisher:

Nature Publishing Group

Language:

English

Submitter:

Factscience Import

Date Deposited:

04 Oct 2013 14:23

Last Modified:

17 Mar 2015 21:02

Publisher DOI:

10.1038/jcbfm.2011.154

PubMed ID:

22146194

Web of Science ID:

000300948200007

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/7885 (FactScience: 213256)

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