Detecting single-target changes in multiple object tracking: The case of peripheral vision

Vater, Christian; Kredel, Ralf; Hossner, Ernst-Joachim (2016). Detecting single-target changes in multiple object tracking: The case of peripheral vision. Attention, perception, & psychophysics : AP&P, 78(4), pp. 1004-1019. Springer 10.3758/s13414-016-1078-7

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In the current study it is investigated whether peripheral vision can be used to monitor multi-ple moving objects and to detect single-target changes. For this purpose, in Experiment 1, a modified MOT setup with a large projection and a constant-position centroid phase had to be checked first. Classical findings regarding the use of a virtual centroid to track multiple ob-jects and the dependency of tracking accuracy on target speed could be successfully replicat-ed. Thereafter, the main experimental variations regarding the manipulation of to-be-detected target changes could be introduced in Experiment 2. In addition to a button press used for the detection task, gaze behavior was assessed using an integrated eye-tracking system. The anal-ysis of saccadic reaction times in relation to the motor response shows that peripheral vision is naturally used to detect motion and form changes in MOT because the saccade to the target occurred after target-change offset. Furthermore, for changes of comparable task difficulties, motion changes are detected better by peripheral vision than form changes. Findings indicate that capabilities of the visual system (e.g., visual acuity) affect change detection rates and that covert-attention processes may be affected by vision-related aspects like spatial uncertainty. Moreover, it is argued that a centroid-MOT strategy might reduce the amount of saccade-related costs and that eye-tracking seems to be generally valuable to test predictions derived from theories on MOT. Finally, implications for testing covert attention in applied settings are proposed.

Item Type:

Journal Article (Original Article)

Division/Institute:

07 Faculty of Human Sciences > Institute of Sport Science (ISPW)
07 Faculty of Human Sciences > Institute of Sport Science (ISPW) > Sport Science IV

UniBE Contributor:

Vater, Christian; Kredel, Ralf and Hossner, Ernst-Joachim

Subjects:

700 Arts > 790 Sports, games & entertainment

ISSN:

1943-3921

Publisher:

Springer

Language:

English

Submitter:

Christian Vater

Date Deposited:

15 Mar 2016 15:07

Last Modified:

25 Apr 2019 09:39

Publisher DOI:

10.3758/s13414-016-1078-7

BORIS DOI:

10.7892/boris.79571

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/79571

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