Internal Models, Vestibular Cognition, and Mental Imagery: Conceptual Considerations

Mast, Fred W.; Ellis, Andrew W. (2015). Internal Models, Vestibular Cognition, and Mental Imagery: Conceptual Considerations. Multisensory research, 28(5-6), pp. 443-460. Brill 10.1163/22134808-00002503

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Vestibular cognition has recently gained attention. Despite numerous experimental and clinical demonstrations, it is not yet clear what vestibular cognition really is. For future research in vestibular cognition, adopting a computational approach will make it easier to explore the underlying mech- anisms. Indeed, most modeling approaches in vestibular science include a top-down or a priori component. We review recent Bayesian optimal observer models, and discuss in detail the conceptual value of prior assumptions, likelihood and posterior estimates for research in vestibular cognition. We then consider forward models in vestibular processing, which are required in order to distinguish between sensory input that is induced by active self-motion, and sensory input that is due to passive self-motion. We suggest that forward models are used not only in the service of estimating sensory states but they can also be drawn upon in an offline mode (e.g., spatial perspective transformations), in which interaction with sensory input is not desired. A computational approach to vestibular cogni- tion will help to discover connections across studies, and it will provide a more coherent framework for investigating vestibular cognition.

Item Type:

Journal Article (Original Article)

Division/Institute:

07 Faculty of Human Sciences > Institute of Psychology > Cognitive Psychology, Perception and Methodology
10 Strategic Research Centers > Center for Cognition, Learning and Memory (CCLM)

UniBE Contributor:

Mast, Fred and Ellis, Andrew William

Subjects:

100 Philosophy > 150 Psychology

ISSN:

2213-4794

Publisher:

Brill

Language:

English

Submitter:

Andrew William Ellis

Date Deposited:

30 Mar 2016 11:21

Last Modified:

30 Mar 2016 11:21

Publisher DOI:

10.1163/22134808-00002503

PubMed ID:

26595951

BORIS DOI:

10.7892/boris.80189

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/80189

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