Why babies do not feel pain, or: How structure-derived functional interpretations can go wrong

Segner, Helmut (2016). Why babies do not feel pain, or: How structure-derived functional interpretations can go wrong. Animal Sentience: An Interdisciplinary Journal on Animal Feeling, 2016.33

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The response to pain involves a non-conscious, reflexive action and a conscious perception. According to Key (2016), consciousness — and thus pain perception — depends on a neuronal correlate that has a “unique neural architecture” as realized in the human cortex. On the basis of the “bioengineering principle that structure determines function,” Key (2016) concludes that animal species such as fish, which lack the requisite cortex-like neuroanatomical structure, are unable to feel pain. This commentary argues that the relationship between brain structure and brain function is less straightforward than suggested in Key’s target article.

Item Type:

Journal Article (Original Article)

Division/Institute:

05 Veterinary Medicine > Research Foci > Veterinary Public Health / Herd Health Management
05 Veterinary Medicine > Department of Infectious Diseases and Pathobiology (DIP)
05 Veterinary Medicine > Department of Infectious Diseases and Pathobiology (DIP) > Center for Fish and Wildlife Health (FIWI)

UniBE Contributor:

Segner, Helmut

Subjects:

600 Technology > 630 Agriculture

ISSN:

2377-7478

Language:

English

Submitter:

Lucia Gugger-Raaflaub

Date Deposited:

19 Apr 2016 15:42

Last Modified:

19 Apr 2016 15:42

BORIS DOI:

10.7892/boris.80197

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/80197

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