Exposure assessment of extended-spectrum beta-lactamases/AmpC beta-lactamases-producing Escherichia coli in meat in Denmark

Gomes do Carmo, Luis Pedro; Nielsen, Liza R; da Costa, Paulo M; Alban, Lis (2014). Exposure assessment of extended-spectrum beta-lactamases/AmpC beta-lactamases-producing Escherichia coli in meat in Denmark. Infection Ecology & Epidemiology, 4 Co-Action Publishing 10.3402/iee.v4.22924

[img]
Preview
Text
pdf_1.pdf - Published Version
Available under License Creative Commons: Attribution-Noncommercial (CC-BY-NC).

Download (998kB) | Preview

INTRODUCTION

Extended-spectrum beta-lactamases (ESBL) and AmpC beta-lactamases (AmpC) are of concern for veterinary and public health because of their ability to cause treatment failure due to antimicrobial resistance in Enterobacteriaceae. The main objective was to assess the relative contribution (RC) of different types of meat to the exposure of consumers to ESBL/AmpC and their potential importance for human infections in Denmark.

MATERIAL AND METHODS

The prevalence of each genotype of ESBL/AmpC-producing E. coli in imported and nationally produced broiler meat, pork and beef was weighted by the meat consumption patterns. Data originated from the Danish surveillance program for antibiotic use and antibiotic resistance (DANMAP) from 2009 to 2011. DANMAP also provided data about human ESBL/AmpC cases in 2011, which were used to assess a possible genotype overlap. Uncertainty about the occurrence of ESBL/AmpC-producing E. coli in meat was assessed by inspecting beta distributions given the available data of the genotypes in each type of meat.

RESULTS AND DISCUSSION

Broiler meat represented the largest part (83.8%) of the estimated ESBL/AmpC-contaminated pool of meat compared to pork (12.5%) and beef (3.7%). CMY-2 was the genotype with the highest RC to human exposure (58.3%). However, this genotype is rarely found in human infections in Denmark.

CONCLUSION

The overlap between ESBL/AmpC genotypes in meat and human E. coli infections was limited. This suggests that meat might constitute a less important source of ESBL/AmpC exposure to humans in Denmark than previously thought - maybe because the use of cephalosporins is restricted in cattle and banned in poultry and pigs. Nonetheless, more detailed surveillance data are required to determine the contribution of meat compared to other sources, such as travelling, pets, water resources, community and hospitals in the pursuit of a full source attribution model.

Item Type:

Journal Article (Original Article)

Division/Institute:

05 Veterinary Medicine > Department of Clinical Research and Veterinary Public Health (DCR-VPH)
05 Veterinary Medicine > Department of Clinical Research and Veterinary Public Health (DCR-VPH) > Veterinary Public Health Institute

UniBE Contributor:

Gomes do Carmo, Luis Pedro

Subjects:

600 Technology > 630 Agriculture

ISSN:

2000-8686

Publisher:

Co-Action Publishing

Language:

English

Submitter:

Susanne Agnes Lerch

Date Deposited:

25 May 2016 16:24

Last Modified:

22 Mar 2017 11:54

Publisher DOI:

10.3402/iee.v4.22924

PubMed ID:

24511370

Uncontrolled Keywords:

AmpC; E. coli; ESBL; exposure assessment; meat

BORIS DOI:

10.7892/boris.80591

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/80591

Actions (login required)

Edit item Edit item
Provide Feedback