Microstructure and Cerebral Blood Flow within White Matter of the Human Brain: A TBSS Analysis.

Giezendanner, Stéphanie; Fisler, Melanie; Soravia, Leila M.; Andreotti, Jennifer; Walther, Sebastian; Wiest, Roland; Dierks, Thomas; Federspiel, Andrea (2016). Microstructure and Cerebral Blood Flow within White Matter of the Human Brain: A TBSS Analysis. PLoS ONE, 11(3), e0150657. Public Library of Science 10.1371/journal.pone.0150657

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BACKGROUND White matter (WM) fibers connect different brain regions and are critical for proper brain function. However, little is known about the cerebral blood flow in WM and its relation to WM microstructure. Recent improvements in measuring cerebral blood flow (CBF) by means of arterial spin labeling (ASL) suggest that the signal in white matter may be detected. Its implications for physiology needs to be extensively explored. For this purpose, CBF and its relation to anisotropic diffusion was analyzed across subjects on a voxel-wise basis with tract-based spatial statistics (TBSS) and also across white matter tracts within subjects. METHODS Diffusion tensor imaging and ASL were acquired in 43 healthy subjects (mean age = 26.3 years). RESULTS CBF in WM was observed to correlate positively with fractional anisotropy across subjects in parts of the splenium of corpus callosum, the right posterior thalamic radiation (including the optic radiation), the forceps major, the right inferior fronto-occipital fasciculus, the right inferior longitudinal fasciculus and the right superior longitudinal fasciculus. Furthermore, radial diffusivity correlated negatively with CBF across subjects in similar regions. Moreover, CBF and FA correlated positively across white matter tracts within subjects. CONCLUSION The currently observed findings on a macroscopic level might reflect the metabolic demand of white matter on a microscopic level involving myelination processes or axonal function. However, the exact underlying physiological mechanism of this relationship needs further evaluation.

Item Type:

Journal Article (Original Article)

Division/Institute:

04 Faculty of Medicine > University Psychiatric Services > University Hospital of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy > Translational Research Center
04 Faculty of Medicine > University Psychiatric Services > University Hospital of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy > Psychiatric Neurophysiology (discontinued)
04 Faculty of Medicine > University Psychiatric Services > University Hospital of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy > Management
04 Faculty of Medicine > Department of Radiology, Neuroradiology and Nuclear Medicine (DRNN) > Institute of Diagnostic and Interventional Neuroradiology

UniBE Contributor:

Giezendanner, Stéphanie; Fisler, Melanie; Soravia, Leila; Andreotti, Jennifer; Walther, Sebastian; Wiest, Roland; Dierks, Thomas and Federspiel, Andrea

Subjects:

600 Technology > 610 Medicine & health

ISSN:

1932-6203

Publisher:

Public Library of Science

Language:

English

Submitter:

Martin Zbinden

Date Deposited:

08 Jun 2016 13:47

Last Modified:

25 Jan 2017 15:32

Publisher DOI:

10.1371/journal.pone.0150657

PubMed ID:

26942763

BORIS DOI:

10.7892/boris.81247

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/81247

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