[Historical review and future orientations of the conventional vascular microanastomoses]

Leclère, F M P; Schoofs, M; Mordon, S (2011). [Historical review and future orientations of the conventional vascular microanastomoses]. Annales de chirurgie plastique et esthétique, 56(3), pp. 232-40. Issy-les-Moulineaux (F): Elsevier Masson SAS 10.1016/j.anplas.2009.12.009

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Microvascular surgery has become an important method for reconstructing surgical defects due to trauma, tumors or after burn. The most important factor for successful free flap transfer is a well-executed anastomosis. The time needed to perform the anastomosis and the failure rate are not negligible despite the high level of operator's experience. During the history, many alternatives were tried to help the microsurgeon and to reduce the complications. A Medline literature search was performed to find articles dealing with non-suture methods of microvascular anastomosis. Many historical books were also included. The non-suture techniques can be divided into four groups based on the used mechanism of sutures: double intubation including tubes and stents, intubation-eversion including simple rings, double eversion including staples and double rings, and wall adjustement with adhesives or laser. All these techniques were able to produce a faster and easier microvascular anastomosis. Nevertheless, disadvantages of the suturless techniques include toxicity, high cost, leakage or aneurysm formation. More refinement is needed before their widespread adoption. Thus, laser-assisted microvascular anastomosis using 1,9 μm diode laser appeared to be a safe and reliable help for the microsurgeon and may be further developed in the near future.

Item Type:

Journal Article (Further Contribution)

Division/Institute:

04 Faculty of Medicine > Department of Orthopaedic, Plastic and Hand Surgery (DOPH) > Clinic of Plastic and Hand Surgery > Hand Surgery

UniBE Contributor:

Leclère, Franck-Marie

ISSN:

0294-1260

Publisher:

Elsevier Masson SAS

Language:

French

Submitter:

Factscience Import

Date Deposited:

04 Oct 2013 14:23

Last Modified:

17 Mar 2015 21:03

Publisher DOI:

10.1016/j.anplas.2009.12.009

PubMed ID:

20646821

Web of Science ID:

000291923000008

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/8183 (FactScience: 213678)

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