Present-day vegetation and the Holocene and recent development of Egelsee-Moor, Salzburg province, Austria

Krisai, Robert; van Leeuwen, Jacqueline F. N.; van der Knaap, Willem Oscar (2016). Present-day vegetation and the Holocene and recent development of Egelsee-Moor, Salzburg province, Austria. Vegetation History and Archaeobotany, 25(6), pp. 555-568. Springer 10.1007/s00334-016-0568-9

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This paper describes the present-day vegetation, stratigraphy and developmental history of the mire of Egelsee-Moor (Salzburg, Austria; 45°45′N, 13°8.5′E, 700 m a.s.l., 15 ha in area) since the early Late Glacial on the basis of 4 transects with 14 trial borings across the peatland. We present a vegetation map of the mire, a longitudinal section through the peat body based on six cores showing the peat types, overview macrofossil diagrams of six cores showing the local mire development and two pollen diagrams covering the Late Glacial and Holocene. The chronology of the diagrams depends on biostratigraphic dating for the Late Glacial and early Holocene and radiocarbon dating for the remaining Holocene. The northern part of the mire originated through terrestrialisation of nutrient-rich, mostly inundated fen and the southern part through paludification of wet soils. The very small lake of today was a reservoir until recently for providing water-power for timber rafting (‘Holztrift’). The mire vegetation today is a complex of forested parts (mainly planted Pinus sylvestris and Thuja occidentalis, but also spontaneous Picea abies, Betula pubescens and Frangula alnus), reed-lands (Phragmites) and litter meadows (Molinietum, Schoenetum, etc.). The central part has hummock-hollow complexes with regionally rare species of transitional mires (Drosera anglica, D. intermedia, Lycopodiella inundata, Scorpidium scorpioides, Sphagnum platyphyllum, S. subnitens). The results indicate that some of the mid-Holocene sediments may have been removed by the timber-rafting practices, and that water extraction from the hydrological catchment since 1967 has resulted in a partial shift of transitional mire to ombrotrophic bog. The latter potentially endangers the regionally rare species and was used as an argument to stop further water extraction.

Item Type:

Journal Article (Original Article)

Division/Institute:

10 Strategic Research Centers > Oeschger Centre for Climate Change Research (OCCR)
08 Faculty of Science > Department of Biology > Institute of Plant Sciences (IPS) > Palaeoecology
08 Faculty of Science > Department of Biology > Institute of Plant Sciences (IPS)

UniBE Contributor:

van Leeuwen, Jacqueline and van der Knaap, Willem Oscar

Subjects:

500 Science > 580 Plants (Botany)

ISSN:

0939-6314

Publisher:

Springer

Language:

English

Submitter:

Peter Alfred von Ballmoos-Haas

Date Deposited:

19 May 2016 08:05

Last Modified:

26 Aug 2019 09:08

Publisher DOI:

10.1007/s00334-016-0568-9

Related URLs:

Uncontrolled Keywords:

Mire stratigraphy; Pollen; Vegetation history; Macrofossils; Present-day vegetation; Nature conservation

BORIS DOI:

10.7892/boris.82040

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/82040

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