Influence of the gestational stage on the clinical course, lesional development and parasite distribution in experimental ovine neosporosis.

Arranz Solis, David; Benavides, Julio; Regidor-Cerrillo, Javier; Fuertes, Miguel; Ferre, Ignacio; Ferreras, Maria Del Carmen; Collantes-Fernández, Esther; Hemphill, Andrew; Pérez, Valentín; Ortega-Mora, Luis Miguel (2015). Influence of the gestational stage on the clinical course, lesional development and parasite distribution in experimental ovine neosporosis. Veterinary research, 46, p. 19. Editions scientifiques Elsevier 10.1186/s13567-014-0139-y

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Neospora caninum is considered one of the main causes of abortion in cattle, yet recent studies have also emphasised its relevance as an abortifacient in small ruminants. In order to gain deeper insight into the pathogenesis of ovine neosporosis, pregnant ewes were intravenously inoculated with 10(6) tachyzoites of the Nc-Spain7 isolate at days 40, 90 or 120 of gestation. Infection during the first term resulted in the death of all foetuses between days 19 and 21 post-infection, showing mainly necrotic lesions in foetal liver and the highest parasite DNA detection and burden in both placenta and foetal viscera. After infection at day 90, foetal death was also detected in all ewes, although later (34-48 days post-infection). In this group, lesions were mainly inflammatory. Foetal livers showed the lowest frequency of lesions, as well as the lowest parasite detection and burden. All ewes infected at day 120 delivered viable lambs, although 3 out of 9 showed weakness and recumbency. Neospora DNA was detected in all lambs but one, and parasite burden was similar to that observed in day 90 group. Lesions in this group showed more conspicuous infiltration of inflammatory cells and higher frequency in foetal brain and muscle when compared to both previous groups. These results highlight the crucial role that the stage of gestation plays on the course of ovine neosporosis, similar to that reported in bovine neosporosis, and open the doors to consider sheep as a valid model for exogenous transplacental transmission for ruminant neosporosis.

Item Type:

Journal Article (Original Article)

Division/Institute:

05 Veterinary Medicine > Research Foci > Host-Pathogen Interaction
05 Veterinary Medicine > Department of Infectious Diseases and Pathobiology (DIP) > Institute of Parasitology
05 Veterinary Medicine > Department of Infectious Diseases and Pathobiology (DIP)

UniBE Contributor:

Arranz Solis, David and Hemphill, Andrew

Subjects:

600 Technology > 630 Agriculture

ISSN:

0928-4249

Publisher:

Editions scientifiques Elsevier

Language:

English

Submitter:

Andrew Hemphill

Date Deposited:

11 May 2016 17:19

Last Modified:

17 Aug 2018 08:02

Publisher DOI:

10.1186/s13567-014-0139-y

PubMed ID:

25884945

BORIS DOI:

10.7892/boris.82048

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/82048

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