The function of secretory IgA in the context of the intestinal continuum of adaptive immune responses in host-microbial mutualism

Geuking, M B; McCoy, K D; Macpherson, A J (2012). The function of secretory IgA in the context of the intestinal continuum of adaptive immune responses in host-microbial mutualism. Seminars in immunology, 24(1), pp. 36-42. Philadelphia, Pa.: W.B. Saunders 10.1016/j.smim.2011.11.005

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The large production of immunoglobulin (Ig)A is energetically costly. The fact that evolution retained this apparent luxury of intestinal class switch recombination to IgA within the human population strongly indicates that there must be a critical specific function of IgA for survival of the species. The function of IgA has been investigated in a series of different models that will be discussed here. While IgA has clear protective functions against toxins or in the context of intestinal viral infections, the function of IgA specific for non-pathogenic commensal bacteria remains unclear. In the context of the current literature we present a hypothesis where secretory IgA integrates as an additional layer of immune function into the continuum of intestinal CD4 T cell responses, to achieve a mutualistic relationship between the intestinal commensal microbiota and the host.

Item Type:

Journal Article (Further Contribution)

Division/Institute:

04 Faculty of Medicine > Department of Gastro-intestinal, Liver and Lung Disorders (DMLL) > Clinic of Visceral Surgery and Medicine > Gastroenterology
04 Faculty of Medicine > Department of Gastro-intestinal, Liver and Lung Disorders (DMLL) > Clinic of Visceral Surgery and Medicine > Visceral Surgery

UniBE Contributor:

Geuking, Markus; McCoy, Kathleen and Macpherson, Andrew

ISSN:

1044-5323

Publisher:

W.B. Saunders

Language:

English

Submitter:

Factscience Import

Date Deposited:

04 Oct 2013 14:23

Last Modified:

06 Dec 2013 13:29

Publisher DOI:

10.1016/j.smim.2011.11.005

PubMed ID:

22138187

Web of Science ID:

000300964600006

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/8205 (FactScience: 213706)

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