Ecosystem size matters: The dimensionality of intralacustrine diversification in Icelandic stickleback is predicted by lake size

Lucek, Kay Jurka Olaf; Kristjánsson, B. K.; Skúlason, S.; Seehausen, Ole (2016). Ecosystem size matters: The dimensionality of intralacustrine diversification in Icelandic stickleback is predicted by lake size. Ecology and evolution, 6(15), pp. 5256-5272. John Wiley & Sons, Inc. 10.1002/ece3.2239

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Cases of evolutionary diversification can be characterized along a continuum from weak to strong genetic and phenotypic differentiation. Several factors may facilitate or constrain the differentiation process. Comparative analyses of replicates of the same taxon at different stages of differentiation can be useful to identify these factors. We estimated the number of distinct phenotypic groups in threespine stickleback populations from nine lakes in Iceland and in one marine population. Using the inferred number of phenotypic groups in each lake, genetic divergence from the marine population, and physical lake and landscape variables, we tested if ecosystem size, approximated by lake size and depth, or isolation from the ancestral marine gene pool predict the occurrence and the extent of phenotypic and genetic diversification within lakes. We find intralacustrine phenotypic diversification to be the rule rather than the exception, occurring in all but the youngest lake population and being manifest in ecologically important phenotypic traits. Neutral genetic data further indicates non-random mating in four out of nine studied lakes, and restricted gene flow between sympatric phenotypic groups in two. Although neither the phenotypic variation nor the number of intralacustrine phenotypic groups were associated with any of our environmental variables, the number of phenotypic traits that were differentiated was significantly positively related to lake size, and evidence for restricted gene flow between sympatric phenotypic groups was only found in the largest lakes where trait specific phenotypic differentiation was highest.

Item Type:

Journal Article (Original Article)

Division/Institute:

08 Faculty of Science > Department of Biology > Institute of Ecology and Evolution (IEE)
08 Faculty of Science > Department of Biology > Institute of Ecology and Evolution (IEE) > Aquatic Ecology

UniBE Contributor:

Lucek, Kay Jurka Olaf and Seehausen, Ole

Subjects:

500 Science > 570 Life sciences; biology

ISSN:

2045-7758

Publisher:

John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

Language:

English

Submitter:

Marcel Häsler

Date Deposited:

12 Jul 2016 12:18

Last Modified:

28 Aug 2016 02:04

Publisher DOI:

10.1002/ece3.2239

BORIS DOI:

10.7892/boris.82585

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/82585

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