On-table reconstruction of comminuted fractures of the radial head

Businger, Adrian; Ruedi, Thomas P; Sommer, Christoph (2010). On-table reconstruction of comminuted fractures of the radial head. Injury - international journal of the care of the injured, 41(6), pp. 583-8. Oxford: Elsevier 10.1016/j.injury.2009.10.026

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The most widely accepted treatment for comminuted fractures of the radial head is either the excision or open reduction and internal fixation. The purpose of the present study is to evaluate the value of an 'on-table' reconstruction technique in severely comminuted fractures of the radial head. In this study, two patients with a Mason type-III and four patients with a Mason type-IV radial-head fracture were treated with 'on-table' reconstruction and fixation using low-profile mini-plates. After a mean follow-up of 112 months (47-154 months), the mean elbow motion was 0-6-141 degrees extension flexion with 79 degrees of pronation and 70 degrees of supination. The mean Broberg and Morrey functional rating score was 97.0 points, the Mayo Elbow Performance Index was 99.2 points and the mean Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder, and Hand (DASH) Outcome Measure score was 1.94 points. One patient had symptoms of degenerative changes, with a slight joint-space narrowing. There were no radiographic signs of devitalisation at final examination. Comminuted fractures of the radial head, which would otherwise require excision, can be successfully treated with an 'on-table' reconstruction technique.

Item Type:

Journal Article (Further Contribution)

Division/Institute:

04 Faculty of Medicine > Department of Gastro-intestinal, Liver and Lung Disorders (DMLL) > Clinic of Visceral Surgery and Medicine > Visceral Surgery

UniBE Contributor:

Businger, Adrian

ISSN:

0020-1383

Publisher:

Elsevier

Language:

English

Submitter:

Factscience Import

Date Deposited:

04 Oct 2013 14:09

Last Modified:

04 May 2014 23:04

Publisher DOI:

10.1016/j.injury.2009.10.026

PubMed ID:

19932475

Web of Science ID:

000277700000007

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/828 (FactScience: 200974)

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