Outcome of smoking cessation counselling of HIV-positive persons by HIV care physicians

Huber, M; Ledergerber, B; Sauter, R; Young, J; Fehr, J; Cusini, A; Battegay, M; Calmy, A; Orasch, C; Nicca, D; Bernasconi, E; Jaccard, R; Held, L; Weber, R; Swiss HIV Cohort Study Group, (2012). Outcome of smoking cessation counselling of HIV-positive persons by HIV care physicians. HIV medicine, 13(7), pp. 387-397. Oxford: Blackwell Science 10.1111/j.1468-1293.2011.00984.x

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OBJECTIVES: Smoking is the most prevalent modifiable risk factor for cardiovascular diseases among HIV-positive persons. We assessed the effect on smoking cessation of training HIV care physicians in counselling. METHODS: The Swiss HIV Cohort Study (SHCS) is a multicentre prospective observational database. Our single-centre intervention at the Zurich centre included a half day of standardized training for physicians in counselling and in the pharmacotherapy of smokers, and a physicians' checklist for semi-annual documentation of their counselling. Smoking status was then compared between participants at the Zurich centre and other institutions. We used marginal logistic regression models with exchangeable correlation structure and robust standard errors to estimate the odds of smoking cessation and relapse. RESULTS: Between April 2000 and December 2010, 11 056 SHCS participants had 121 238 semi-annual visits and 64 118 person-years of follow-up. The prevalence of smoking decreased from 60 to 43%. During the intervention at the Zurich centre from November 2007 to December 2009, 1689 participants in this centre had 6068 cohort visits. These participants were more likely to stop smoking [odds ratio (OR) 1.23; 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.07-1.42; P = 0.004] and had fewer relapses (OR 0.75; 95% CI 0.61-0.92; P = 0.007) than participants at other SHCS institutions. The effect of the intervention was stronger than the calendar time effect (OR 1.19 vs. 1.04 per year, respectively). Middle-aged participants, injecting drug users, and participants with psychiatric problems or with higher alcohol consumption were less likely to stop smoking, whereas persons with a prior cardiovascular event were more likely to stop smoking. CONCLUSIONS: An institution-wide training programme for HIV care physicians in smoking cessation counselling led to increased smoking cessation and fewer relapses.

Item Type:

Journal Article (Original Article)

Division/Institute:

04 Faculty of Medicine > Department of Haematology, Oncology, Infectious Diseases, Laboratory Medicine and Hospital Pharmacy (DOLS) > Clinic of Infectiology

UniBE Contributor:

Cusini, Alexia

ISSN:

1464-2662

Publisher:

Blackwell Science

Language:

English

Submitter:

Factscience Import

Date Deposited:

04 Oct 2013 14:24

Last Modified:

08 Jun 2016 10:26

Publisher DOI:

10.1111/j.1468-1293.2011.00984.x

PubMed ID:

22257025

Web of Science ID:

000305825100001

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/8280 (FactScience: 213797)

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