Parasite-mediated nuclear factor kappaB regulation in lymphoproliferation caused by Theileria parva infection.

Palmer, G H; Machado, J; Fernandez, P; Heussler, Volker; Perinat, T; Dobbelaere, D A (1997). Parasite-mediated nuclear factor kappaB regulation in lymphoproliferation caused by Theileria parva infection. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America - PNAS, 94(23), pp. 12527-12532. National Academy of Sciences NAS

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Infection of cattle with the protozoan Theileria parva results in uncontrolled T lymphocyte proliferation resulting in lesions resembling multicentric lymphoma. Parasitized cells exhibit autocrine growth characterized by persistent translocation of the transcriptional regulatory factor nuclear factor kappaB (NFkappaB) to the nucleus and consequent enhanced expression of interleukin 2 and the interleukin 2 receptor. How T. parva induces persistent NFkappaB activation, required for T cell activation and proliferation, is unknown. We hypothesized that the parasite induces degradation of the IkappaB molecules which normally sequester NFkappaB in the cytoplasm and that continuous degradation requires viable parasites. Using T. parva-infected T cells, we showed that the parasite mediates continuous phosphorylation and proteolysis of IkappaBalpha. However, IkappaBalpha reaccumulated to high levels in parasitized cells, which indicated that T. parva did not alter the normal NFkappaB-mediated positive feedback loop which restores cytoplasmic IkappaBalpha. In contrast, T. parva mediated continuous degradation of IkappaBbeta resulting in persistently low cytoplasmic IkappaBbeta levels. Normal IkappaBbeta levels were only restored following T. parva killing, indicating that viable parasites are required for IkappaBbeta degradation. Treatment of T. parva-infected cells with pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate, a metal chelator, blocked both IkappaB degradation and consequent enhanced expression of NFkappaB dependent genes. However treatment using the antioxidant N-acetylcysteine had no effect on either IkappaB levels or NFkappaB activation, indicating that the parasite subverts the normal IkappaB regulatory pathway downstream of the requirement for reactive oxygen intermediates. Identification of the critical points regulated by T. parva may provide new approaches for disease control as well as increase our understanding of normal T cell function.

Item Type:

Journal Article (Original Article)

Division/Institute:

08 Faculty of Science > Department of Biology > Institute of Cell Biology > Malaria
08 Faculty of Science > Department of Biology > Institute of Cell Biology

UniBE Contributor:

Heussler, Volker

Subjects:

500 Science > 570 Life sciences; biology

ISSN:

0027-8424

Publisher:

National Academy of Sciences NAS

Language:

English

Submitter:

Volker Heussler

Date Deposited:

20 Jun 2016 10:31

Last Modified:

20 Jun 2016 10:31

PubMed ID:

9356483

BORIS DOI:

10.7892/boris.83736

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/83736

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