Does cognitive flexibility predict treatment gains in Internet-delivered psychological treatment of social anxiety disorder, depression, or tinnitus?

Lindner, Philip; Carlbring, Per; Flodman, Erik; Hebert, Amanda; Poysti, Stephanie; Hagkvist, Filip; Johansson, Robert; Zetterqvist Westin, Vendela; Berger, Thomas; Andersson, Gerhard (2016). Does cognitive flexibility predict treatment gains in Internet-delivered psychological treatment of social anxiety disorder, depression, or tinnitus? PeerJ, 4(e1934), pp. 1-13. PeerJ, Inc. 10.7717/peerj.1934

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Little is known about the individual factors that predict outcomes in Internet-administered psychological treatments. We hypothesized that greater cognitive flexibility (i.e. the ability to simultaneously consider several concepts and tasks and switch effortlessly between them in response to changes in environmental contingencies) would provide a better foundation for learning and employing the cognitive restructuring techniques taught and exercised in therapy, leading to greater treatment gains. Participants in three trials featuring Internet-administered psychological treatments for depression (n = 36), social anxiety disorder (n = 115) and tinnitus (n = 53) completed the 64-card Wisconsin Card Sorting Test (WCST) prior to treatment. We found no significant associations between perseverative errors on the WCST and treatment gains in any group. We also found low accuracy in the classification of treatment responders. We conclude that lower cognitive flexibility, as captured by perseverative errors on the WCST, should not impede successful outcomes in Internet-delivered psychological treatments.

Item Type:

Journal Article (Original Article)

Division/Institute:

07 Faculty of Human Sciences > Institute of Psychology > Clinical Psychology and Psychotherapy

UniBE Contributor:

Berger, Thomas

Subjects:

600 Technology > 610 Medicine & health

ISSN:

2167-8359

Publisher:

PeerJ, Inc.

Funders:

[4] Swiss National Science Foundation

Language:

English

Submitter:

Thomas Berger

Date Deposited:

09 Aug 2016 09:02

Last Modified:

09 Aug 2016 09:02

Publisher DOI:

10.7717/peerj.1934

PubMed ID:

27114881

BORIS DOI:

10.7892/boris.85271

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/85271

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