Osseointegration of Zirconia in the Presence of Multinucleated Giant Cells.

Chappuis, Vivianne; Cavusoglu, Yeliz; Gruber, Reinhard; Kuchler, Ulrike; Buser, Daniel; Bosshardt, Dieter (2016). Osseointegration of Zirconia in the Presence of Multinucleated Giant Cells. Clinical implant dentistry and related research, 18(4), pp. 686-698. Wiley 10.1111/cid.12375

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BACKGROUND Current strategies to reduce medical device-associated infections propose zirconia as a potential implant material which may limit bacterial adhesion. Because multinucleated giant cells (MNGCs) have been detected on these implant surfaces, concerns have been raised regarding tissue integration. PURPOSE The present study examined the presence of MNGCs and their subsequent effect upon tissue integration. Surface-modified implants made of yttria-stabilized (TZP) and alumina-toughened zirconia (ATZ) were compared with commercially pure titanium (Ti). MATERIALS AND METHODS Seven miniature pigs received three implants on either side of the maxilla. After healing periods of 4 and 8 weeks, the tissue response at the implant surfaces was characterized according to three specific parameters: bone-to-implant contact (BIC), MNGC-to-implant contact (MIC), and the peri-implant bone density (BD). RESULTS Despite being present on all tested implant surfaces, MNGCs were not associated with an inflammatory cell infiltrate or with fibrous encapsulation. MNGCs were less numerous on the Ti implants (range: 3.9-5.2%) compared with the ceramic implants (range: 17.6-30.3%, p < .0001). Even though the values of newly formed bone and pristine bone in direct contact with the implant surfaces were high at 4 weeks (tBIC: Ti = 82.3%, TZP = 64.3%, ATZ = 70%), a negative correlation was observed between the presence of MNGCs and newly formed bone at the implant surface (p < .001). Interestingly, the newly formed peri-implant bone density, defined as the percentage of new bone area inside the screw threads (nBD), was not diminished by the presence of MNGCs. CONCLUSIONS Differences in the presence of MNGCs and the BIC parameters between Ti and the ceramic implants appear to be a local cellular phenomenon which is restricted to the implant-bone marrow interface and do not affect the peri-implant bone formation. Factors triggering MNGC differentiation and their persistence in response to biomaterial surface need to be investigated in future studies.

Item Type:

Journal Article (Original Article)

Division/Institute:

04 Faculty of Medicine > School of Dental Medicine > School of Dental Medicine, Oral Surgery Research
04 Faculty of Medicine > School of Dental Medicine > School of Dental Medicine, Orthodontic Research
04 Faculty of Medicine > School of Dental Medicine > School of Dental Medicine, Restorative Dentistry, Research
04 Faculty of Medicine > School of Dental Medicine > Department of Preventive, Restorative and Pediatric Dentistry
04 Faculty of Medicine > School of Dental Medicine > Department of Oral Surgery and Stomatology
04 Faculty of Medicine > School of Dental Medicine > School of Dental Medicine, Periodontics Research

UniBE Contributor:

Chappuis, Vivianne; Gruber, Reinhard; Kuchler, Ulrike; Buser, Daniel and Bosshardt, Dieter

Subjects:

600 Technology > 610 Medicine & health

ISSN:

1523-0899

Publisher:

Wiley

Language:

English

Submitter:

Eveline Carmen Schuler

Date Deposited:

12 Aug 2016 09:26

Last Modified:

20 Sep 2017 22:31

Publisher DOI:

10.1111/cid.12375

PubMed ID:

26377587

Uncontrolled Keywords:

biomaterials, endosseous dental Implantation, giant cells, macrophages, osteogenesis, surface chemistry, titanium, zirconium oxide

BORIS DOI:

10.7892/boris.85840

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/85840

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