The Use of Signal-Transduction and Metabolic Pathways to Predict Human Disease Targets from Electric and Magnetic Fields Using in vitro Data in Human Cell Lines

Parham, F; Portier, CJ; Chang, X; Mevissen, Meike (2016). The Use of Signal-Transduction and Metabolic Pathways to Predict Human Disease Targets from Electric and Magnetic Fields Using in vitro Data in Human Cell Lines. Frontiers in Public Health, 4(193), p. 193. Frontiers Research Foundation 10.3389/fpubh.2016.00193

[img]
Preview
Text
fpubh-04-00193.pdf - Published Version
Available under License Creative Commons: Attribution (CC-BY).

Download (197kB) | Preview

Using in-vitro data in human cell lines, several research groups have investigated changes in gene expression in cellular systems following exposure to extremely low frequency (ELF) and radiofrequency (RF) electromagnetic fields (EMF). For ELF EMF, we obtained 5 studies with complete microarray data and 3 studies with only lists of significantly altered genes. Likewise, for RF EMF we obtained 13 complete microarray data sets and 5 limited datasets. Plausible linkages between exposure to ELF and RF EMF and human diseases were identified using a three-step process: a) linking genes associated with classes of human diseases to molecular pathways; b) linking pathways to ELF and RF EMF microarray data; and c) identifying associations between human disease and EMF exposures where the pathways are significantly similar. A total of 60 pathways were associated with human diseases, mostly focused on basic cellular functions like JAK-STAT signaling or metabolic functions like xenobiotic metabolism by cytochrome P450 enzymes. ELF EMF datasets were sporadically linked to human diseases but no clear pattern emerged. Individual data sets showed some linkage to cancer, chemical dependency, metabolic disorders and neurological disorders. RF EMF datasets were not strongly linked to any disorders. Based on these analyses, the most promising area for further research would be to focus on EMF and neurological function and disorders.

Item Type:

Journal Article (Original Article)

Division/Institute:

05 Veterinary Medicine > Research Foci > NeuroCenter
05 Veterinary Medicine > Department of Clinical Research and Veterinary Public Health (DCR-VPH) > Veterinary Pharmacology and Toxicology
05 Veterinary Medicine > Department of Clinical Research and Veterinary Public Health (DCR-VPH)

UniBE Contributor:

Mevissen, Meike

Subjects:

500 Science > 570 Life sciences; biology

ISSN:

2296-2565

Publisher:

Frontiers Research Foundation

Language:

English

Submitter:

Angélique Ducray

Date Deposited:

15 Sep 2016 13:56

Last Modified:

17 Apr 2018 10:40

Publisher DOI:

10.3389/fpubh.2016.00193

PubMed ID:

27656641

BORIS DOI:

10.7892/boris.87710

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/87710

Actions (login required)

Edit item Edit item
Provide Feedback