Causal evidence for the role of REM sleep theta rhythm in contextual memory consolidation.

Boyce, Richard; Glasgow, Stephen D; Williams, Sylvain; Adamantidis, Antoine Roger (2016). Causal evidence for the role of REM sleep theta rhythm in contextual memory consolidation. Science, 352(6287), pp. 812-816. American Association for the Advancement of Science 10.1126/science.aad5252

[img] Text
812.full.pdf - Published Version
Restricted to registered users only
Available under License Publisher holds Copyright.

Download (2MB) | Request a copy

Rapid eye movement sleep (REMS) has been linked with spatial and emotional memory consolidation. However, establishing direct causality between neural activity during REMS and memory consolidation has proven difficult because of the transient nature of REMS and significant caveats associated with REMS deprivation techniques. In mice, we optogenetically silenced medial septum γ-aminobutyric acid-releasing (MS(GABA)) neurons, allowing for temporally precise attenuation of the memory-associated theta rhythm during REMS without disturbing sleeping behavior. REMS-specific optogenetic silencing of MS(GABA) neurons selectively during a REMS critical window after learning erased subsequent novel object place recognition and impaired fear-conditioned contextual memory. Silencing MS(GABA) neurons for similar durations outside REMS episodes had no effect on memory. These results demonstrate that MS(GABA) neuronal activity specifically during REMS is required for normal memory consolidation.

Item Type:

Journal Article (Original Article)

Division/Institute:

04 Faculty of Medicine > Department of Head Organs and Neurology (DKNS) > Clinic of Neurology

UniBE Contributor:

Adamantidis, Antoine Roger

Subjects:

600 Technology > 610 Medicine & health

ISSN:

0036-8075

Publisher:

American Association for the Advancement of Science

Language:

English

Submitter:

Stefanie Hetzenecker

Date Deposited:

19 Sep 2016 10:03

Last Modified:

19 Sep 2016 10:03

Publisher DOI:

10.1126/science.aad5252

PubMed ID:

27174984

BORIS DOI:

10.7892/boris.87815

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/87815

Actions (login required)

Edit item Edit item
Provide Feedback