Does erosion progress differently on teeth already presenting clinical signs of erosive tooth wear than on sound teeth? An in vitro pilot trial.

Saads Carvalho, Thiago; Baumann, Tommy; Lussi, Adrian (2016). Does erosion progress differently on teeth already presenting clinical signs of erosive tooth wear than on sound teeth? An in vitro pilot trial. BMC Oral Health, 17(14), p. 14. BioMed Central 10.1186/s12903-016-0231-y

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BACKGROUND Erosive tooth wear (ETW) is clinically characterized by a loss of tooth surface, and different enamel depths may have different susceptibility to demineralization. Therefore, the aim of this in vitro pilot study was to assess if the progression of erosive demineralization is faster on teeth already presenting signs of ETW when compared to originally sound teeth. METHODS We selected 23 central incisors: 14 were clinically sound (Sound) and 9 presented clinical signs of early erosive tooth wear (ETW-teeth). The teeth were embedded in resin, leaving an uncovered window of native enamel (6.69 ± 2.30 mm(2)) on the incisal half of the labial surface. We measured enamel surface reflection intensity (SRI) initially and after each consecutive erosive challenge (1 % citric acid, total of 4, 8, 12, 16, 20 and 24 min). Calcium released to the citric acid was measured with an atomic absorption spectrometer. RESULTS We observed higher initial SRI values in ETW-teeth than in Sound teeth (p = 0.007). During in vitro erosive demineralization, we observed that erosion on originally Sound teeth progressed significantly slower (p = 0.033) than on ETW-teeth: SRI decreased by 75 % (from 100 to 25 %) on Sound teeth, and by 89 % (from 100 to 11 %) on ETW-teeth. Calcium release increased during erosion, but presented no significant differences (p = 0.643) between originally Sound (0.031 μmol/mm(2)) and ETW-teeth (0.032 μmol/mm(2)). There was satisfactory correlation between calcium release and rSRI values (r s  = -0.66). CONCLUSION The optical reflectometer distinguished originally sound teeth from those with signs of ETW, and the results suggest that acid demineralization progresses differently on teeth already presenting clinical signs of ETW than on sound teeth.

Item Type:

Journal Article (Original Article)

Division/Institute:

04 Faculty of Medicine > School of Dental Medicine
04 Faculty of Medicine > School of Dental Medicine > Department of Preventive, Restorative and Pediatric Dentistry

UniBE Contributor:

Saads Carvalho, Thiago; Baumann, Tommy and Lussi, Adrian

Subjects:

600 Technology > 610 Medicine & health

ISSN:

1472-6831

Publisher:

BioMed Central

Language:

English

Submitter:

Tommy Baumann

Date Deposited:

29 Sep 2016 14:36

Last Modified:

02 Oct 2016 02:12

Publisher DOI:

10.1186/s12903-016-0231-y

PubMed ID:

27430320

Uncontrolled Keywords:

Assessment; Calcium; Dental erosion; Diagnostics; Enamel; Optical reflectometer; Reflection analysis; Susceptibility

BORIS DOI:

10.7892/boris.88811

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/88811

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