Early onset of laying and bumblefoot favor keel bone fractures.

Gebhardt-Henrich, Sabine; Fröhlich, E K F (2015). Early onset of laying and bumblefoot favor keel bone fractures. Animals, 5(4), pp. 1192-1206. MDPI 10.3390/ani5040406

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Numerous studies have demonstrated influences of hybrid, feed, and housing on prevalence of keel bone fractures, but influences of behavior and production on an individual level are less known. In this longitudinal study, 80 white and brown laying hens were regularly checked for keel bone deviations and fractures while egg production was individually monitored using Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) from production until depopulation at 65 weeks of age. These focal birds were kept in eight pens with 20 hens per pen in total. About 62% of the hens had broken keel bones at depopulation. The occurrence of new fractures was temporally linked to egg laying: more new fractures occurred during the time when laying rates were highest. Hens with fractured keel bones at depopulation had laid their first egg earlier than hens with intact keel bones. However, the total number of eggs was neither correlated with the onset of egg laying nor with keel bone fractures. All birds with bumblefoot on both feet had a fracture at depopulation. Hens stayed in the nest for a longer time during egg laying during the ten days after the fracture than during the ten days before the fracture. In conclusion, a relationship between laying rates and keel bone fractures seems likely.

Item Type:

Journal Article (Original Article)

Division/Institute:

05 Veterinary Medicine > Department of Clinical Research and Veterinary Public Health (DCR-VPH) > Veterinary Public Health Institute > Animal Welfare Division
05 Veterinary Medicine > Department of Clinical Research and Veterinary Public Health (DCR-VPH)

UniBE Contributor:

Gebhardt, Sabine

ISSN:

2076-2615

Publisher:

MDPI

Language:

English

Submitter:

Jeremy Davidson Bailoo

Date Deposited:

04 Oct 2016 15:25

Last Modified:

10 Sep 2017 08:38

Publisher DOI:

10.3390/ani5040406

PubMed ID:

26633520

BORIS DOI:

10.7892/boris.89089

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/89089

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