Resting-state hyperperfusion of the supplementary motor area in catatonia

Walther, Sebastian; Schäppi, Lea; Federspiel, Andrea; Bohlhalter, Stephan; Wiest, Roland; Strik, Werner; Stegmayer, Katharina (2016). Resting-state hyperperfusion of the supplementary motor area in catatonia. Schizophrenia bulletin, 43(5), pp. 972-981. Oxford University Press 10.1093/schbul/sbw140

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Catatonia is a psychomotor syndrome that not only frequently occurs in the context of schizophrenia but also in other conditions. The neural correlates of catatonia remain unclear due to small-sized studies. We therefore compared resting-state cerebral blood flow (rCBF) and gray matter (GM) density between schizophrenia patients with current catatonia and without catatonia and healthy controls. We included 42 schizophrenia patients and 41 controls. Catatonia was currently present in 15 patients (scoring >2 items on the Bush Francis Catatonia Rating Scale screening). Patients did not differ in antipsychotic medication or positive symptoms. We acquired whole-brain rCBF using arterial spin labeling and GM density. We compared whole-brain perfusion and GM density over all and between the groups using 1-way ANCOVAs (F and T tests). We found a group effect (F test) of rCBF within bilateral supplementary motor area (SMA), anterior cingulate cortex, dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, left interior parietal lobe, and cerebellum. T tests indicated 1 cluster (SMA) to be specific to catatonia. Moreover, catatonia of excited and retarded types differed in SMA perfusion. Furthermore, increased catatonia severity was associated with higher perfusion in SMA. Finally, catatonia patients had a distinct pattern of GM density reduction compared to controls with prominent GM loss in frontal and insular cortices. SMA resting-state hyperperfusion is a marker of current catatonia in schizophrenia. This is highly compatible with a dysregulated motor system in catatonia, particularly affecting premotor areas. Moreover, SMA perfusion was differentially altered in retarded and excited catatonia subtypes, arguing for distinct pathobiology.

Item Type:

Journal Article (Original Article)

Division/Institute:

04 Faculty of Medicine > Department of Head Organs and Neurology (DKNS) > Clinic of Neurology
04 Faculty of Medicine > University Psychiatric Services > University Hospital of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy > Management
04 Faculty of Medicine > Department of Radiology, Neuroradiology and Nuclear Medicine (DRNN) > Institute of Diagnostic and Interventional Neuroradiology
04 Faculty of Medicine > University Psychiatric Services > University Hospital of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy > Translational Research Center

UniBE Contributor:

Walther, Sebastian; Schäppi, Lea; Federspiel, Andrea; Bohlhalter, Stephan; Wiest, Roland; Strik, Werner and Stegmayer, Katharina

Subjects:

600 Technology > 610 Medicine & health

ISSN:

0586-7614

Publisher:

Oxford University Press

Language:

English

Submitter:

Martin Zbinden

Date Deposited:

27 Oct 2016 10:52

Last Modified:

17 Sep 2017 02:26

Publisher DOI:

10.1093/schbul/sbw140

PubMed ID:

27729486

Uncontrolled Keywords:

SMA; arterial spin labeling; cerebellum; motor system; retarded catatonia; subthalamic nucleus

BORIS DOI:

10.7892/boris.89339

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/89339

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