Balancing competing needs in kidney transplantation: does an allocation system prioritizing children affect the renal transplant function?

Weitz, Marcus; Sazpinar, Onur; Schmidt, Maria; Neuhaus, Thomas J; Maurer, Elisabeth; Kuehni, Claudia; Parvex, Paloma; Chehade, Hassib; Tschumi, Sibylle; Immer, Franz; Laube, Guido F (2017). Balancing competing needs in kidney transplantation: does an allocation system prioritizing children affect the renal transplant function? Transplant international, 30(1), pp. 68-75. Wiley-Blackwell 10.1111/tri.12874

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Children often merit priority in access to deceased donor kidneys by organ-sharing organizations. We report the impact of the new Swiss Organ Allocation System (SOAS) introduced in 2007, offering all kidney allografts from deceased donors <60 years preferentially to children. The retrospective cohort study included all paediatric transplant patients (<20 years of age) before (n = 19) and after (n = 32) the new SOAS (from 2001 to 2014). Estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR), urine protein-to-creatinine ratio (UPC), need for antihypertensive medication, waiting times to kidney transplantation (KTX), number of pre-emptive transplantations and rejections, and the proportion of living donor transplants were considered as outcome parameters. Patients after the new SOAS had significantly better eGFRs 2 years after KTX (Mean Difference, MD = 25.7 ml/min/1.73 m(2) , P = 0.025), lower UPC ratios (Median Difference, MeD = -14.5 g/mol, P = 0.004), decreased waiting times to KTX (MeD = -97 days, P = 0.021) and a higher proportion of pre-emptive transplantations (Odds Ratio = 9.4, 95% CI = 1.1-80.3, P = 0.018), while the need for antihypertensive medication, number of rejections and living donor transplantations remained stable. The new SOAS is associated with improved short-term clinical outcomes and more rapid access to KTX. Despite lacking long-term research, the study results should encourage other policy makers to adopt the SOAS approach.

Item Type:

Journal Article (Original Article)

Division/Institute:

04 Faculty of Medicine > Pre-clinic Human Medicine > Institute of Social and Preventive Medicine

UniBE Contributor:

Maurer, Elisabeth and Kühni, Claudia

Subjects:

600 Technology > 610 Medicine & health
300 Social sciences, sociology & anthropology > 360 Social problems & social services

ISSN:

0934-0874

Publisher:

Wiley-Blackwell

Language:

English

Submitter:

Doris Kopp Heim

Date Deposited:

23 Nov 2016 08:55

Last Modified:

13 Oct 2017 02:30

Publisher DOI:

10.1111/tri.12874

PubMed ID:

27732754

Uncontrolled Keywords:

children, kidney allocation, kidney transplant function, policy analysis

BORIS DOI:

10.7892/boris.90528

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/90528

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