Amino Acid Composition in Rhizomes of Wetland Species in Their Natural Habitat and under Anoxia

Haldemann, Christoph; Brändle, Roland (1988). Amino Acid Composition in Rhizomes of Wetland Species in Their Natural Habitat and under Anoxia. Flora, 180(5-6), pp. 407-411. Elsevier 10.1016/S0367-2530(17)30331-6

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Marsh plants rhizomes in their natural habitat accumulate before outgrowth in early spring large amounts of arginine (Acorus calamus) or asparagine (Phragmites australis, Schoenoplectus lacustris and Typha angustifolia). Anoxic treatment for 10 d lowers the amino acid content in rhizomes of P. australis and T. latifolia. Only the concentrations of γ-aminobutyric acid and alanine increase. A. calamus shows a different behaviour. There, most of the amino acids slightly increase. Arginine is still predominant under anoxia compared with γ-aminobutyric acid and alanine. The results are discussed in relation to protein mobilisation and rhizome survival strategies. In addition, the investigations exhibit marked physiological differences between anoxic and flooded conditions.

Item Type:

Journal Article (Original Article)

Division/Institute:

08 Faculty of Science > Department of Biology > Institute of Plant Sciences (IPS) > Anoxia / Postanoxia [discontinued]
08 Faculty of Science > Department of Biology > Institute of Plant Sciences (IPS)

UniBE Contributor:

Brändle, Roland

Subjects:

500 Science > 580 Plants (Botany)

ISSN:

0367-2530

Publisher:

Elsevier

Language:

English

Submitter:

Peter Alfred von Ballmoos-Haas

Date Deposited:

06 Jun 2017 15:28

Last Modified:

14 Nov 2017 15:22

Publisher DOI:

10.1016/S0367-2530(17)30331-6

Uncontrolled Keywords:

marsh plant rhizomes; amino acids; anoxia; flooding

BORIS DOI:

10.7892/boris.91776

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/91776

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