Practice patterns in the management of acute intervertebral disc herniation in dogs

Moore, Sarah A; Early, Peter J; Hettlich, Bianca Felicitas (2016). Practice patterns in the management of acute intervertebral disc herniation in dogs. Journal of small animal practice, 57(8), pp. 409-415. Pergamon Press 10.1111/jsap.12496

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Objectives Acute intervertebral disc herniation is commonly managed by veterinary neurologists and surgeons. Anecdote suggests that patterns of management vary considerably and there is controversy surrounding many aspects of treatment. The goal of this study was to document patterns in management of acute spinal cord injury caused by acute intervertebral disc herniation among these two groups to aid in future discussions on best practices. Methods A survey querying diagnostic, medical and surgical practices for dogs with acute intervertebral disc herniation was distributed to diplomates on the databases of the American College of Veterinary Surgeons and the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine (Neurology). Results Responses were received from 314 board-certified veterinary surgeons and neurologists. Both groups handled timing of decompression, surgical approach, and most postoperative recommendations in a similar fashion. Case volume differed between groups, with 77% of neurologists and 18% of surgeons managing ê50 cases of acute intervertebral disc herniation per year. MRI was used most frequently as a diagnostic tool by neurologists (75%), while CT was used most commonly by surgeons (58%). Corticosteroids were routinely administered as a neuroprotective strategy by 34% of surgeons and 11% of neurologists. Disc fenestration was performed “always” or “most of the time” by 69% of neurologists and 36% of surgeons. Clinical Importance Understanding the common practices in the management of canine acute intervertebral disc herniation can provide a springboard for future discussions regarding the best practices in diagnosing and treating this disease.

Item Type:

Journal Article (Original Article)

Division/Institute:

05 Veterinary Medicine > Department of Clinical Veterinary Medicine (DKV)
05 Veterinary Medicine > Department of Clinical Veterinary Medicine (DKV) > Small Animal Clinic > Small Animal Clinic, Surgery
05 Veterinary Medicine > Department of Clinical Veterinary Medicine (DKV) > Small Animal Clinic

UniBE Contributor:

Hettlich, Bianca Felicitas

Subjects:

600 Technology > 610 Medicine & health

ISSN:

0022-4510

Publisher:

Pergamon Press

Language:

English

Submitter:

Bianca Felicitas Hettlich

Date Deposited:

15 Feb 2017 15:17

Last Modified:

17 Feb 2017 18:12

Publisher DOI:

10.1111/jsap.12496

PubMed ID:

27256593

BORIS DOI:

10.7892/boris.92171

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/92171

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