Incidence of intraoperative seizures during motor evoked potential monitoring in a large cohort of patients undergoing different surgical procedures.

Ulkatan, Sedat; Jaramillo, Ana Maria; Téllez, Maria J; Kim, Jinu; Deletis, Vedran; Seidel, Kathleen (2017). Incidence of intraoperative seizures during motor evoked potential monitoring in a large cohort of patients undergoing different surgical procedures. Journal of neurosurgery, 126(4), pp. 1296-1302. American Association of Neurological Surgeons 10.3171/2016.4.JNS151264

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OBJECTIVE The purpose of this study was to investigate the incidence of seizures during the intraoperative monitoring of motor evoked potentials (MEPs) elicited by electrical brain stimulation in a wide spectrum of surgeries such as those of the orthopedic spine, spinal cord, and peripheral nerves, interventional radiology procedures, and craniotomies for supra- and infratentorial tumors and vascular lesions. METHODS The authors retrospectively analyzed data from 4179 consecutive patients who underwent surgery or an interventional radiology procedure with MEP monitoring. RESULTS Of 4179 patients, only 32 (0.8%) had 1 or more intraoperative seizures. The incidence of seizures in cranial procedures, including craniotomies and interventional neuroradiology, was 1.8%. In craniotomies in which transcranial electrical stimulation (TES) was applied to elicit MEPs, the incidence of seizures was 0.7% (6/850). When direct cortical stimulation was additionally applied, the incidence of seizures increased to 5.4% (23/422). Patients undergoing craniotomies for the excision of extraaxial brain tumors, particularly meningiomas (15 patients), exhibited the highest risk of developing an intraoperative seizure (16 patients). The incidence of seizures in orthopedic spine surgeries was 0.2% (3/1664). None of the patients who underwent surgery for conditions of the spinal cord, neck, or peripheral nerves or who underwent cranial or noncranial interventional radiology procedures had intraoperative seizures elicited by TES during MEP monitoring. CONCLUSIONS In this largest such study to date, the authors report the incidence of intraoperative seizures in patients who underwent MEP monitoring during a wide spectrum of surgeries such as those of the orthopedic spine, spinal cord, and peripheral nerves, interventional radiology procedures, and craniotomies for supra- and infratentorial tumors and vascular lesions. The low incidence of seizures induced by electrical brain stimulation, particularly short-train TES, demonstrates that MEP monitoring is a safe technique that should not be avoided due to the risk of inducing seizures.

Item Type:

Journal Article (Original Article)

Division/Institute:

04 Faculty of Medicine > Department of Head Organs and Neurology (DKNS) > Clinic of Neurosurgery

UniBE Contributor:

Seidel, Kathleen

Subjects:

600 Technology > 610 Medicine & health

ISSN:

0022-3085

Publisher:

American Association of Neurological Surgeons

Language:

English

Submitter:

Nicole Söll

Date Deposited:

07 Apr 2017 14:01

Last Modified:

07 Apr 2017 14:02

Publisher DOI:

10.3171/2016.4.JNS151264

PubMed ID:

27341047

Uncontrolled Keywords:

AED = antiepileptic drug; DCS = direct cortical stimulation; MEP; MEP = motor evoked potential; TES = transcranial electrical stimulation; TIVA = total intravenous anesthesia; epilepsy; intraoperative monitoring; seizure; surgery

BORIS DOI:

10.7892/boris.92803

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/92803

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