A sorrow shared is a sorrow halved? A three-arm randomized controlled trial comparing internet-based clinician-guided individual versus group treatment for social anxiety disorder

Schulz, Ava; Stolz, Timo; Vincent, Alessia; Krieger, Tobias; Andersson, Gerhard; Berger, Thomas (2016). A sorrow shared is a sorrow halved? A three-arm randomized controlled trial comparing internet-based clinician-guided individual versus group treatment for social anxiety disorder. Behaviour research and therapy, 84, pp. 14-26. Elsevier 10.1016/j.brat.2016.07.001

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A growing body of evidence suggests that internet-based cognitive behavioural treatments (ICBT) are effective to treat social anxiety disorder (SAD). Whereas the efficacy of clinician-guided ICBT has been established, ICBT in a group format has not yet been systematically investigated. This three-arm RCT compared the efficacy of clinician-guided group ICBT (GT) with clinician guided individual ICBT (IT) and a wait-list (WL). A total of 149 individuals meeting the diagnostic criteria for SAD were randomly assigned to one of three conditions. Primary endpoints were self-report measures of SAD and diagnostic status taken at baseline, after the twelve-week intervention and at six-month follow-up. Secondary endpoints were symptoms of depression, interpersonal problems and general symptomatology. At post-treatment, both active conditions showed superior outcome regarding SAD symptoms (GT vs. WL: d = 0.84-0.74; IT vs. WL: d = 0.94-1.22). The two active conditions did not differ significantly in symptom reduction (d = 0.12-0.26, all ps > 0.63), diagnostic response rate or attrition. Treatment gains were maintained at follow-up. The group format reduced weekly therapist time per participant by 71% (IT: 17 min, GT: 5 min). Findings indicate that a clinician-guided group format is a promising approach in treating SAD.

Item Type:

Journal Article (Original Article)

Division/Institute:

07 Faculty of Human Sciences > Institute of Psychology > Clinical Psychology and Psychotherapy
07 Faculty of Human Sciences > Institute of Psychology

UniBE Contributor:

Schulz, Ava; Stolz, Timo Johannes; Vincent, Alessia Michelle; Krieger, Tobias and Berger, Thomas

Subjects:

600 Technology > 610 Medicine & health
100 Philosophy > 150 Psychology

ISSN:

0005-7967

Publisher:

Elsevier

Language:

English

Submitter:

Salome Irina Rahel Bötschi

Date Deposited:

29 May 2017 14:56

Last Modified:

20 May 2020 09:55

Publisher DOI:

10.1016/j.brat.2016.07.001

PubMed ID:

27423374

Uncontrolled Keywords:

Group therapy; Guided self-help; ICBT; Internet treatment; Peer support; RCT; Social anxiety disorder

BORIS DOI:

10.7892/boris.93333

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/93333

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