Wharton's Jelly Mesenchymal Stem Cells Protect the Immature Brain in Rats and Modulate Cell Fate.

Müller, Martin; Oppliger, Byron; Jörger Messerli, Marianne; Reinhart, Ursula; Barnea, Eytan; Paidas, Michael; Kramer, Boris W; Surbek, Daniel; Schoeberlein, Andreina (2017). Wharton's Jelly Mesenchymal Stem Cells Protect the Immature Brain in Rats and Modulate Cell Fate. Stem cells and development, 26(4), pp. 239-248. Mary Ann Liebert 10.1089/scd.2016.0108

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The development of a mammalian brain is a complex and long-lasting process. Not surprisingly, preterm birth is the leading cause of death in newborns and children. Advances in perinatal care reduced mortality, but morbidity still represents a major burden. New therapeutic approaches are thus desperately needed. Given that mesenchymal stem/stromal cells (MSCs) emerged as a promising candidate for cell therapy, we transplanted MSCs derived from the Wharton's Jelly (WJ-MSCs) to reduce the burden of immature brain injury in a murine animal model. WJ-MSCs transplantation resulted in protective activity characterized by reduced myelin loss and astroglial activation. WJ-MSCs improved locomotor behavior as well. To address the underlying mechanisms, we tested the key regulators of responses to DNA-damaging agents, such as cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase/calcium-dependent protein kinase (PKA/PKC), cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK), ataxia-telangiectasia-mutated/ATM- and Rad3-related (ATM/ATR) substrates, protein kinase B (Akt), and 14-3-3 binding protein partners. We characterized WJ-MSCs using a specific profiler polymerase chain reaction array. We provide evidence that WJ-MSCs target pivotal regulators of the cell fate such as CDK/14-3-3/Akt signaling. We identified leukemia inhibitory factor as a potential candidate of WJ-MSCs' induced modifications as well. We hypothesize that WJ-MSCs may exert adaptive responses depending on the type of injury they are facing, making them prominent candidates for cell therapy in perinatal injuries.

Item Type:

Journal Article (Original Article)

Division/Institute:

04 Faculty of Medicine > Department of Gynaecology, Paediatrics and Endocrinology (DFKE) > Clinic of Gynaecology

UniBE Contributor:

Müller, Martin; Oppliger, Byron; Jörger Messerli, Marianne; Reinhart, Ursula; Surbek, Daniel and Schoeberlein, Andreina

Subjects:

600 Technology > 610 Medicine & health

ISSN:

1547-3287

Publisher:

Mary Ann Liebert

Language:

English

Submitter:

Monika Zehr

Date Deposited:

30 Jan 2017 17:12

Last Modified:

27 Mar 2019 11:36

Publisher DOI:

10.1089/scd.2016.0108

PubMed ID:

27842457

Uncontrolled Keywords:

WJ-MSCs; cell fate; neuroprotection

BORIS DOI:

10.7892/boris.94129

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/94129

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