Comparative anatomy and biomechanical properties of atlantoaxial ligaments in equine, bovine, and canine cadaveric specimens.

Forterre, Franck; Stoffel, Michael Hubert; Koch, Christoph; Precht, Maria Christina; Waschk, Maja Alice; Bürki, Alexander (2017). Comparative anatomy and biomechanical properties of atlantoaxial ligaments in equine, bovine, and canine cadaveric specimens. Veterinary and comparative orthopaedics and traumatology, 30(3), pp. 219-222. Schattauer 10.3415/VCOT-16-09-0131

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OBJECTIVES Atlantoaxial instability has been reported in humans, dogs, equids and ruminants. The functional role of the atlantoaxial ligaments has only been described rudimentarily in equids and ruminants. The goal of the present cadaveric study was to compare the anatomy between the different species and to comparatively assess the role of the stabilizing ligaments of the atlantoaxial joint under sagittal shear loading in canine, equine, and bovine cervical spines. METHODS Three equine, bovine, and canine cadaveric specimens were investigated. Biomechanical testing was performed using a purpose built shear-testing device driven by a uniaxial servo-hydraulic testing machine. Three cycles in a dorsoventral direction with a constant quasi-static velocity of 0.2 mm/s up to a limiting force of 50 N (canine) or 250 N (bovine, equine), respectively, were performed for each specimen tested. Load and linear displacement were measured by the displacement sensor and load cell of the testing system at a sampling rate of 20 Hz. Tests were performed and the range of motion determined with both intact and transected atlantoaxial ligaments. RESULTS The range of motion was significantly increased after transection of the ligaments only in the canine specimens. The bovine atlantoaxial joint was biomechanically more stable than in equids. CLINICAL SIGNIFICANCE Species-specific anatomical and biomechanical differences of the atlantoaxial ligaments in canines, equids, and bovines were detected. The significance of these differences and their impact on the pathogenesis of atlantoaxial subluxations and subsequent treatment remain open questions.

Item Type:

Journal Article (Original Article)

Division/Institute:

05 Veterinary Medicine > Research Foci > NeuroCenter
04 Faculty of Medicine > Pre-clinic Human Medicine > Institute for Surgical Technology & Biomechanics ISTB
05 Veterinary Medicine > Department of Clinical Veterinary Medicine (DKV) > Equine Clinic
05 Veterinary Medicine > Department of Clinical Veterinary Medicine (DKV)
05 Veterinary Medicine > Department of Clinical Veterinary Medicine (DKV) > Small Animal Clinic > Small Animal Clinic, Surgery
05 Veterinary Medicine > Department of Clinical Veterinary Medicine (DKV) > DKV - Clinical Radiology
05 Veterinary Medicine > Department of Clinical Veterinary Medicine (DKV) > Small Animal Clinic
05 Veterinary Medicine > Department of Clinical Research and Veterinary Public Health (DCR-VPH) > Veterinary Anatomy
05 Veterinary Medicine > Department of Clinical Research and Veterinary Public Health (DCR-VPH)

UniBE Contributor:

Forterre, Franck; Stoffel, Michael Hubert; Koch, Christoph; Precht, Maria Christina; Waschk, Maja Alice and Bürki, Alexander

Subjects:

500 Science > 570 Life sciences; biology
600 Technology > 610 Medicine & health
600 Technology > 630 Agriculture

ISSN:

0932-0814

Publisher:

Schattauer

Language:

English

Submitter:

Miriam Francine Heinzelmann

Date Deposited:

14 Jul 2017 15:08

Last Modified:

14 Feb 2019 16:17

Publisher DOI:

10.3415/VCOT-16-09-0131

PubMed ID:

28094418

Uncontrolled Keywords:

Atlantoaxial ligaments; biomechanical properties; cow; dog; horse

BORIS DOI:

10.7892/boris.94510

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/94510

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