Isolation and identification of Caviibacter abscessus from cervical abscesses in a series of pet guinea pigs (Cavia porcellus).

Bemis, David A; Johnson, Brian H; Bryant, Mary Jean; Jones, Rebekah D; McCleery, Brynn V; Greenacre, Cheryl B; Perreten, Vincent; Kania, Stephen A (2016). Isolation and identification of Caviibacter abscessus from cervical abscesses in a series of pet guinea pigs (Cavia porcellus). Journal of veterinary diagnostic investigation, 28(6), pp. 763-769. American Association of Veterinary Laboratory Diagnosticians AAVLD 10.1177/1040638716665660

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An organism reported in the early literature to be a rare cause of cervical lymphadenitis in guinea pigs, Streptobacillus moniliformis, has been reclassified as Caviibacter abscessus We describe a series of sequential cases of abscesses in guinea pigs that were presented to our clinic from which the only agent isolated was a unique, serum-requiring bacterium. Discrete colonies were not detected in 6.5% CO2 or anaerobically on routine primary isolation media containing up to 5% whole sheep blood, with and without cysteine, vitamin K, and hemin supplementation after 7 days of incubation at 37°C. Based on subsequently determined growth requirements, the organisms were best described as serum-requiring, aerotolerant anaerobes. Colonies were detectable within 24 h at 37°C in an anaerobic atmosphere on a mycoplasma agar-based medium containing 10% pig serum and reached 3 mm in diameter within 3-5 days. Microscopic appearance consisted of small gram-negative rods and coccobacilli with occasional filaments. However, in direct smears from clinical specimens and from weak or dysgonic growth on plates incubated under suboptimal growth conditions (e.g., in 6.5% CO2), irregular rods with occasional small bulbous forms or numerous long wavy filaments were observed. All of the isolates generated unique spectral profiles similar to that of C. abscessus when examined by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry. Phylogenetic analysis of partial 16S rRNA gene sequences showed that the isolates were identical to each other and shared 99.9% sequence identity with C. abscessus.

Item Type:

Journal Article (Original Article)

Division/Institute:

05 Veterinary Medicine > Department of Infectious Diseases and Pathobiology (DIP) > Institute of Veterinary Bacteriology > Molecular Bacterial Epidemiology and Infectiology
05 Veterinary Medicine > Department of Infectious Diseases and Pathobiology (DIP)
05 Veterinary Medicine > Department of Infectious Diseases and Pathobiology (DIP) > Institute of Veterinary Bacteriology

UniBE Contributor:

Perreten, Vincent

Subjects:

500 Science > 570 Life sciences; biology
600 Technology > 610 Medicine & health

ISSN:

1040-6387

Publisher:

American Association of Veterinary Laboratory Diagnosticians AAVLD

Language:

English

Submitter:

Vincent Perreten

Date Deposited:

19 Jul 2017 15:00

Last Modified:

20 Jul 2017 11:55

Publisher DOI:

10.1177/1040638716665660

PubMed ID:

27698164

Uncontrolled Keywords:

Caviibacter abscessus; Leptotrichiaceae; cervical abscess; guinea pigs

BORIS DOI:

10.7892/boris.95370

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/95370

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