Neonicotinoids override a parasite exposure impact on hibernation success of a key bumblebee pollinator

Fauser-Misslin, Aline; Sandrock, Christoph; Neumann, Peter; Sadd, Ben M. (2017). Neonicotinoids override a parasite exposure impact on hibernation success of a key bumblebee pollinator. Ecological entomology, 42(3), pp. 306-314. Wiley 10.1111/een.12385

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1. The persistence of both geographical and reproductive boundaries between related species poses a fundamental puzzle in biology. Reproductive interactions between species can have a substantial impact on the maintenance of a boundary, potentially contributing to its collapse (e.g. via hybridisation) or facilitating reproductive isolation (e.g. via reinforcement). 2. The degree to which two parapatric insect species in the genus Phymata are reproductively isolated was evaluated and several mechanisms that could contribute to the maintenance of species boundaries were assessed. 3. Behavioural assays showed no indication of species-assortative mating, nor any fecundity costs associated with heterospecific mating. Thus, there was no evidence of prezygotic mechanisms of reproductive isolation between the two species. 4.In laboratory crosses, it was found that the two species were indeed capable of producing viable F1 hybrids. Morphologically, these hybrids were phenotypically intermediate to the two parental species, and similar to the phenotypes seen in natural populations thought to occur in a hybrid zone. F1 hybrids did not show reduced viability, although there was some suggestion of ‘hybrid breakdown’, evident from the lower viability observed for progeny of ‘natural hybrids’. 5. Collectively, we show that despite genetically based morphological differences between species, P. americana and pennsylvanica can, and probably do hybridise. More studies are needed to understand the mechanisms that maintain the distinct phenotypes and geographical ranges of these species, despite the considerable potential for introgression.

Item Type:

Journal Article (Original Article)

Division/Institute:

05 Veterinary Medicine > Department of Clinical Research and Veterinary Public Health (DCR-VPH)
05 Veterinary Medicine > Department of Clinical Research and Veterinary Public Health (DCR-VPH) > Institute of Bee Health

UniBE Contributor:

Fauser-Misslin, Aline and Neumann, Peter

Subjects:

500 Science > 590 Animals (Zoology)
600 Technology > 630 Agriculture

ISSN:

0307-6946

Publisher:

Wiley

Language:

English

Submitter:

Gina Retschnig

Date Deposited:

05 Jul 2017 16:14

Last Modified:

05 Jul 2017 16:14

Publisher DOI:

10.1111/een.12385

BORIS DOI:

10.7892/boris.95469

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/95469

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