Listeria monocytogenes sequence type 1 is predominant in ruminant rhombencephalitis

Dreyer, Margaux Charline Laura; Aguilar Bultet, Lisandra; Rupp, Sebastian Dominic Alexander; Guldimann, Claudia; Stephan, R; Schock, A; Otter, A; Schüpbach, Gertraud; Brisse, S; Lecuit, M; Frey, Joachim; Oevermann, Anna (2016). Listeria monocytogenes sequence type 1 is predominant in ruminant rhombencephalitis. Scientific Reports, 6(36419), p. 36419. Nature Publishing Group 10.1038/srep36419

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Listeria (L.) monocytogenes is an opportunistic pathogen causing life-threatening infections in diverse mammalian species including humans and ruminants. As little is known on the link between strains and clinicopathological phenotypes, we studied potential strain-associated virulence and organ tropism in L. monocytogenes isolates from well-defined ruminant cases of clinical infections and the farm environment. The phylogeny of isolates and their virulence-associated genes were analyzed by multilocus sequence typing (MLST) and sequence analysis of virulence-associated genes. Additionally, a panel of representative isolates was subjected to in vitro infection assays. Our data suggest the environmental exposure of ruminants to a broad range of strains and yet the strong association of sequence type (ST) 1 from clonal complex (CC) 1 with rhombencephalitis, suggesting increased neurotropism of ST1 in ruminants, which is possibly related to its hypervirulence. This study emphasizes the importance of considering clonal background of L. monocytogenes isolates in surveillance, epidemiological investigation and disease control.

Item Type:

Journal Article (Original Article)

Division/Institute:

05 Veterinary Medicine > Research Foci > NeuroCenter
05 Veterinary Medicine > Research Foci > Veterinary Public Health / Herd Health Management
05 Veterinary Medicine > Research Foci > Host-Pathogen Interaction
05 Veterinary Medicine > Department of Clinical Research and Veterinary Public Health (DCR-VPH) > Veterinary Public Health Institute
05 Veterinary Medicine > Department of Clinical Research and Veterinary Public Health (DCR-VPH) > Experimental Clinical Research
05 Veterinary Medicine > Department of Infectious Diseases and Pathobiology (DIP)
05 Veterinary Medicine > Department of Clinical Research and Veterinary Public Health (DCR-VPH)
05 Veterinary Medicine > Department of Infectious Diseases and Pathobiology (DIP) > Institute of Veterinary Bacteriology

UniBE Contributor:

Dreyer, Margaux Charline Laura; Aguilar Bultet, Lisandra; Rupp, Sebastian Dominic Alexander; Guldimann, Claudia; Schüpbach, Gertraud; Frey, Joachim and Oevermann, Anna

Subjects:

500 Science > 570 Life sciences; biology
600 Technology > 630 Agriculture

ISSN:

2045-2322

Publisher:

Nature Publishing Group

Language:

English

Submitter:

Susanne Agnes Lerch

Date Deposited:

21 Jul 2017 08:34

Last Modified:

11 Oct 2018 16:58

Publisher DOI:

10.1038/srep36419

PubMed ID:

27848981

BORIS DOI:

10.7892/boris.96188

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/96188

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