Does systemic lidocaine reduce ketamine requirements for endotracheal intubation in calves?

Lauper, Josiane; Marolf, Vincent; Levionnois, Olivier; Schelling, Esther; Meylan, Mireille; Spadavecchia, Claudia (2017). Does systemic lidocaine reduce ketamine requirements for endotracheal intubation in calves? Veterinary anaesthesia and analgesia, 44(2), pp. 281-286. Elsevier 10.1016/j.vaa.2016.07.002

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OBJECTIVE To investigate whether an intravenous (IV) lidocaine bolus in calves premedicated with xylazine-butorphanol reduces the amount of ketamine required to allow endotracheal intubation. STUDY DESIGN Randomized, prospective clinical study. ANIMALS In total, 41 calves scheduled for elective umbilical surgery. METHODS Calves were randomly assigned to one of two groups (L: lidocaine or S: saline). The calves were administered xylazine (0.07 mg kg(-1)) and butorphanol (0.1 mg kg(-1)) intramuscularly and 10 minutes later lidocaine (2 mg kg(-1); group L) or saline (group S) IV over 1 minute. After 2 minutes, ketamine (2.5 mg kg(-1)) was injected IV. If the depth of anaesthesia was insufficient for intubation, additional ketamine (1 mg kg(-1)) was administered every minute until intubation was successful. The amount of ketamine required for intubation, respiratory rate, pulse rate, arterial pressures, the depth of sedation and conditions of endotracheal intubation after induction of anaesthesia were compared between the two groups. RESULTS The calves in group L were sedated more deeply than those in group S; however, neither the median (range) amount of ketamine required for intubation, 3.5 (2.5-4.5) mg kg(-1) and 3.5 (2.5-3.5) mg kg(-1), respectively, nor the induction quality differed significantly between the groups. CONCLUSION AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE A bolus of lidocaine (2 mg kg(-1)) administered 10 minutes after xylazine-butorphanol in calves deepened the degree of sedation but did not decrease the requirement of ketamine for endotracheal intubation. No adverse effects were recorded in the physiological variables measured.

Item Type:

Journal Article (Original Article)

Division/Institute:

05 Veterinary Medicine > Research Foci > Veterinary Public Health / Herd Health Management
05 Veterinary Medicine > Department of Clinical Veterinary Medicine (DKV)
05 Veterinary Medicine > Department of Clinical Veterinary Medicine (DKV) > Clinic for Ruminants
05 Veterinary Medicine > Department of Clinical Veterinary Medicine (DKV) > Small Animal Clinic
05 Veterinary Medicine > Department of Clinical Veterinary Medicine (DKV) > DKV - Anaesthesiology

UniBE Contributor:

Lauper, Josiane; Marolf, Vincent; Levionnois, Olivier; Meylan, Mireille and Spadavecchia, Claudia

Subjects:

600 Technology > 630 Agriculture
500 Science > 570 Life sciences; biology
600 Technology > 610 Medicine & health

ISSN:

1467-2987

Publisher:

Elsevier

Language:

English

Submitter:

Jeannette Glauser

Date Deposited:

11 Oct 2017 16:38

Last Modified:

09 Nov 2018 09:54

Publisher DOI:

10.1016/j.vaa.2016.07.002

PubMed ID:

28456603

Uncontrolled Keywords:

anaesthesia induction calves ketamine lidocaine physiological variables

BORIS DOI:

10.7892/boris.101803

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/101803

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